The Rest is Drag with Queen Salina Estitties
PRIDE
PRIDE

Episode · 3 years ago

The Rest is Drag with Queen Salina Estitties

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Drag Race might just be the hottest show in the world right now, but what does it actually take to be a drag performer? For Jason De Puy, better known as Salina Estitties, it's a LOT of work. But when you realize your creative outlet also lets you communicate better with the world around you and show it who you are inside, then you become a true artist. Be sure to follow Salina Estitties! Your host is Levi Chambers, co-founder of Gayety. Follow the show and keep up with the conversation @LGBT, @LGBTQ, and @Pride. Want more great shows from Straw Hut Media? Check out or website at strawhutmedia.com. Your producers are Will Sterling and Ryan Tillotson. Have an interesting LGBTQ+ story to share? We might feature U! Email us at lgbtq@strawhutmedia.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Straw media. If you've been living under a rock for the past twelve years, you might have missed the fact that drag is at the top of its game. Sure, it's been around since the dawn of the arts, but drag queens are fiercer than ever thanks to shows like Rupaul's drag rigs. Now, events Brunges, clubs and bars are drawing bigger and bigger crowds to watch these ladies perform, and their TV audiences are getting larger and larger. But most people only see the GLITZ and Glam of some of these queens incredible performances. What they don't see is how challenging and difficult it is to be a drag queen. There's a lot of Corsets, wigs, heels, taping and tucking involved. Also, audiences can get the maximum amount of entertainment from these talented artists, giving the illusion that all this just comes naturally. Jason Dipui, probably better known to most as Selina as titties, is a drag queen out here in West Hollywood, California, which is arguably one of the most important drag capitals of the world. But his hustle to become the next major drag sensation isn't necessarily about the spotlight or the money. Sure, a lot of the time drag can be about being loud and flashy and pushing the envelope, but it's also about the emotion behind these queens that drives their desire to suffer for both beauty and art. Storytelling is a universal drive for all kinds of performers, and when your outlet is dragged, you don't just get to tell your story, you get to celebrate. I'm mean by chambers and from strahut media. This is lgbtq plus. You will drag race. I'm Jason Depui. I'm twenty years old. I've lived in West Hollywood for about eleven years and I am an entertaintress by the name of Selena s titties, a little drag performers, show girl baby Latin X. Whoo. Jason has been doing drag for a long time, but becoming a working drag queen was not always the plan. I came out to California when I was seventeen years old, right out of high school, and I went to college for musical theater.

I got my BFA musical theater. Then I did a professional dance program where I got a dance agent. So I was twenty two at this time, BFA, musical theater, dancer to the stars, ready to go hit Hollywood take it over by storm. Bet Ale. Everybody was like, all right, take off your shirts at auditions and honey, I'm a little thick gums, I you know, I don't got the West Hollywood six pack and all that. You know. So what happened when I gave Jason Lemons? So I wasn't booking anything. So I decided, well, he'll Hollywood doesn't want me, I'm gonna create my own work, create my own alley, and I started doing drag because it was an interesting way to be able to perform everything I wanted to perform, you know, do parts. I always wanted to perform, choreograph things, I wanted to dance without anyone having to tell me how to do it. I was helping a friend do drag and I was giving her all my creative juices. I was like you should do this, Oh, you should do this. I was making her outfits, I was making music and stuff for her and I was choreographing stuff and she wouldn't execute it as fierce as I could have. So I was like girl, move out of the way. I'm lucky for him he found success pretty quickly. been so I started doing amateur competitions in West Hollywood at the Abbey at Nicky's, and I want a lot of them and I want a really big one. That was hosted. You know, the main judges were Raven and Morgan mcmichaels, so its kind of under their thumb, which was very high pressure and, like you know, the it pushed me faster and harder than I would have ever probably pushed myself on my own, and that's kind of a how it all began. Not everyone might be able to get such a stellar start to their career. Being a performer of any kind involves a lot of ups and downs, but it always helps to have a support system, both professionally and personally. So what did his parents think? You know, my parents completely, a hundred percent support me hardcore, like I could be doing cartwheels in a Rodeo and they'd be clapping for me, like they're just happy that I went to college and that I'm happy and doing what I love. Like I'm very lucky to have supportive parents in that way. And...

...when they came to my first drag show, actually I was I was so scared. I was like, my dad is like much, he small Latino, you know, he had me karate for thirteen years growing up. I was bowling, I was playing football for him, like I did all the boy stuff that Latin Dad's put their boys through, you know. So I was so nervous and like he couldn't have been more proud of me, and I think he was actually a little turned on by Selina. To be honest. If being a drag performer seems like one of life's biggest risks, imagine what it was like for him when he and his brother came out. I came out, okay, my brother's also gay, but my brother's a year younger than me, and him out when he was sixteen and it was over a course of three days. And I always had this mental I grew up watching shows like Degrassi and like these high school angst TV shows with gay characters who, you know, they go through all the traumatic experiences being gay coming out. So I watched all that on TV. So I always thought to myself, well, I'm not going to be like that. I'm a bad bitch, like if my parents have, you know, anything against it, fuck them, I'm going to go off and can we safe? Is this scoops right? Okay, I was like, fuck them, I'm gonna go off and live my life and you know what, you don't have to be a part of it. Like I had this inner ankst like ready to rebel. So when my brother came out, my dad came up into the room. I was seventeen and he was like, Hey, your brother just came out to us. Is there anything you want to say to us? And I was like and he was like, because it's okay if you are, and I'm like, well, I said at the time. I what I said was I like what I like when I like it, you know, and he was like, awesome, we love you no matter what, and I was like, you know. But lucky for them they had another supportive family member who just happened to live in one of the most supportive places for queer culture. Then I also had a gay uncle that we grew up with. My parents had me when they're eighteen, so you know, that's a really young age to have to two boys. They were always working, so I was always with my uncle's in the Castro in San Francis just go running...

...around with Rainbow flags everywhere. So I grew up in a very gay friendly environment, so it was no surprise that you were gay, you know what I mean. But it was a very supporting and very loving like atmosphere for us to to be able to come out and lit be ourselves. From then on, there was not going to be any doubts about it. Jason was a performer and lucky for us, he found that voice in drag. I kind of just let it be and like, for a minute, I think my my mom was holding on to me being bisexual for the hopes of, like, me getting married and having kids, but I think the minute they came out to see me perform in drag they're like, okay, we get it. Maybe you're wondering what's one of the biggest hurdles for a drag performer. It might not be a surprise to some, but that shit is expensive. It was hard to book gigs. I was just doing it for fun and, like I said, I was away for me to be creative and express like all fat sets of my talents, because I, you know, I was a musical theater of major I seeing. I act and I dance and, you know, when you perform a drag your lip singing a song, so you're able to, you know, in a way incorporate all levels of those all those colors of performance. So it was for fun in the beginning and then, when I realize you can make money out of it, as like, Oh hell yeah, and I started like, you know, just pushing a little more and more. But, like I said, I ended up getting burnt out. It was really expensive, you know, the whigs, the costumes, the makeup, it like all adds up, especially if you want to look good. It's easy to look busted on a budget, but to look good is really hard. So I did get burnt out and I had to take a minute and step back and be like what am I doing this for? Why am I pursuing this? Is it to get on drag race? Is it has been my own selfish, like egotistical reasons for wanting to the lime light in a way at a bar of all places. Like, why am I doing drag? With all things in life, you will be most happy if you work doesn't feel like work but instead is...

...fun and satisfies the self. So how did Jason Find that creativity and pick himself up when life had him down? So I was kind of at a lull in my entire life. This was like twenty four, hundred and twenty five, and I was back home, burnt out, and I was like I was with family who I felt, you know, loved and supported from, because it gets really lonely here in the city. La is so big, you know what I mean. And I was coming back on a Greyhound bust into Hollywood and I was listening to a podcast with Ru Paul and Oprah and Rupaul had said something that destruct a chord in me and it made me realize because I'm also sober. I'm spen sober for seven years after I graduated college. I got a little wild and crazy and I cleaned up my act at twenty one. I got sober twenty one. So on top of all this, I can't drink or user do drugs that all my peers are doing to cope with their lives, you know what I mean. So I was just like, what's going on? What is happening in my life? Why is nothing working? Why am I not booking this? What do I want to do? Am I really a dancer, like what I want to do. Like so I'm coming back home on the Greyhound bus. Rupaul said something and it hit me that there's a reason I got sober so young. I got sober at twenty one for a reason. Twenty one year old don't get sober, you know what I mean, like there's a reason that happens. And I had to look at why that happened for me and why all my experiences up to that point brought me to that point and I realized, you know what, drag keeps popping up in my life for some reason and I'm able to use that to convey a message of hope, of inspiration, of love, of entertainment, of humor, of laughter, like all my dragon compasses that and I got to accept that in that moment be like, you know what, if I do drag, it's going to be purposeful and it's going to have like inspirational, like roots and groundedness to it. In that way, I'm not doing it out of selfishness. Why would anyone wanted? It's hot, it's uncomfortable, it is it is tortuous to being in drag for five hours at a time in a corset and heels, it's like not...

...all that fun, you know what I mean, if it hurts. So I'm like, if I'm going to put myself through this, why am I doing this? It has to be for a bigger picture, for a bigger reason, and that's kind of what I came to in terms to with my drag and I was like, all right, cool, it's filled with purpose and I'm passionate about that, so I can now take that and put it into the world. Let's go for it. When you have to literally suffer for your art, finding that passion behind why that suffering matters means giving real emotion to your craft. Not only does it entertain, but it lives and breathes. If what I'm doing serves their no purpose to help inspire you or change your point of view or like, help you recognize something, why am I doing it? Why is it worth doing? Even my numbers when I'm lip sticking in a bar, like I try to cultivate them in a way that's expressing a story or telling something about myself or about something relatable that the audience can look at and be like, I see myself in this school, you know, because at the end of the day. I'm an artist, I'm a performer, right, like actors do these amazing pieces, like big little lies and all these TV shows that convey this beautiful story. Like I'm the same thing. I just do drag as the platform I do that with. So I like to make sure that everything I'm doing is something people can relate to, something current, and I feel like that always catches your eye. Like if people are writing area fifty one, I should do an alien number right now and comment how it would feel to be an alien getting attacked by these humans all of a sudden, like you know what I mean, like that's where my mind goes when I think of that. And if there's a there's something happening in the world, drag is an interesting way to view it. And if self fulfillment is the highest of highs, sometimes it's also the little things along the way that add fuel to the fire of your personal success. Okay, so there's two different kind of highs that I've had. I feel one is, you know, the content of work that I'm doing, like I was, and this was I was an extra on a star is born, you know what I mean, like just an extra in the background, but being there lady Gaga came up to every drag queen and like thank them for being there, and that was like a high for me. I was like the Queen has her hands on me, you know what I mean, like that was work and I was just an extra in a movie, like whatever. You know, to anyone that's like a big deal,...

...but in that moment was really gratifying just to even watch Gogon Brad the cooper work together, like I was there for the scene where they're in the dressing room and it's like this cute moment where he's wiping off her eyebrow, like watching them work. They did that scene twice and that was it. I was like what, two takes, no script, done and done. It was beautiful to watch that happened. Meeting the Queen of all Queens is exciting, though his biggest reward doesn't necessarily come from fame and fortune, but from meeting people just like you and me, just people who come up to me after a show and they're like I totally related to your number, like I got it, I got it, I got what you were trying to say with you know, and I was like yes, that's why I do it. Is for you, the one person who understands, who needed to hear that for that moment, like that's why I do this. But no journey is possible without struggle, especially when you're worth as a performer and as a person is challenged. I remember one time I used to perform at the Abbey all the time, local barns Hollywood and you know, I remember this was when I was starting out and I was always there booking, booking, performing, killing it, killing it, and in my mind I thought I was getting paid a certain amount of money. Maybe was a lot because I was new to it, and I was like this is so much money to be making a dragon like maybe it was fifty bucks. So I recently went back to this establishment to perform and I got my paycheck after I killed it, killed it, the audience went wild. I was hanging from the ceiling. I don't jumped down to the splits like crazyness. All the Queens backstages were like girl, what did you do? I was like, Oh, nothing, and they're like, bitch, I do nothing every week and that never happens, and I was like yeah, and I got my check and it was like fifty dollars and I was like what? And I was so like shot in the by. mean a normal booking out here is like fifty dollars for two numbers, twenty five a number. That's a normal starting out. Drag Queen rate in like a Bar, you know what I mean. So it wasn't far off. But in my head I thought I was so I don't know, I thought I had like thought it was, you know exactly. I thought I had more value. And when I got home I was like what is my life like? Is this what I'm doing? This for fifty bucks, like it was. I don't know if how much ego was...

...involved with that, with myself, but it was a turning point for me when but I remember recorded a video and I went on this rant. I didn't suppose it anywhere, but I kept it for myself so I can look back later on and like, you know, see how much I was affected by that. Like that was a low point for me because I was like what the hell am I doing this for? You know, and it goes back to what I was talking about earlier. It's not about the money. It's you know, it has to be deeper for me and that's what I had to recognize in order for me to keep on doing this. Even though we might be at a high of drag, excitement and acceptance in some circles, does he still get judging eyes? You know what? Like in La Proper, likes Hollywood and downtown, downtown, you can get a little more head turns. But in whatss Hollywood, it's my territory, Bitch. It's like I'm running this joint. You're in ore, you're in this is our town, here in it. You know, I'm not in yours, interrupting your life. You're here TB are a part of mine. Is kind of how I feel. But I've gone, I've done gigs and stuff like outside of what's Hollywood and in la where it's like, you know, that's it's not normal to see a man dressed up as a woman, this giant, seven foot Glamazon, you know, in front of you. So yeah, it's very people turn heads and they're like what. But you know, drag. One thing it's done for me personally is given me so much confidence and that confidence shines through and I'm in drag and that's been able to transfer to me as a boy, when I'm walking around as a boy in my life. So I think. You know, when I'm in drag, there's no stopping me. Like she's here. I'm like, if I'm doing this, I'm doing this, let's go. The best kind of art is the one that lets us explore not just our talent but our emotions and our personalities. Through drag, Jason hasn't just entertained thousands, he's discovered who he is. If there's anything drag is taught me, it's taught me how to. It's opened up who I am as a person and who I am as Jason. It's I like to I consider Selena as titties, a more exaggerated version of myself. You know, we're the same person. We're not two different characters,...

...too far off, like just a little louder, a little more extreme, and it's everything that's inside of me as Jason, and she's actually brought that out in me, you know. So what I would say is if you can't do drag and if you're somewhere that you can't really do that, it's more about finding out just who you are. Who is this character of who you are. You know, I had to look at who Jason Is. I'm this like sexual being. I like to be stupid. I you know, I'm like, I'm all these different I have all these different shades and colors to who I am, and I was able to express that in my drag. The Joy of drag is that technically it connects us all. As we all explore our authenticity and who we really are on the inside, we have to ask ourselves, in a way, aren't we all in drag on the outside? It's I think it's really about not caring about what people think and looking at who you really are and discovering what that is. You know, and if that means you like to wear flowers in your hair, then that's who you are. Go for it, where flowers in your hair. You know, drag doesn't have to be the entire ful thing. You know, Rupaul says we're all born naked in the rest of his drag and I love that that picture, because it's like, yeah, we're all naked. And what are you putting on? Are you dressing in a suit to go to work? Is that your drag? You know? How how are you expressing yourself? It doesn't have to be the full guiche. If you like crop tops, bitch, wear that fucking crop top. And Live your best little mid section life. You know, if you like like high tops, if that's you relate to that, I don't know. You know, it could be anything. Find Colors of who you really are and find where that expresses. And you know, the physical life. We all know drag race is probably the biggest break any queen could get. So what would jason do if he got on the show? If I were to get on drag race? You know, that's a big opportunity for you to do whatever you want with that platform and I see a lot of people who don't do a lot and they're still performing at bars and getting that good little coin, but they're stuck in the bars. I didn't go to college and I didn't train my ass off dancing every freaking day from seven am to five pm, then working from six PM to zero in the morning and doing the same thing. I didn't put into all that hard work to be stuck in a bar,...

...you know what I mean? Like it's great and it serves its purpose, but I see myself being so much more than that. So I've been thinking, like what is that? You know, what is more out there? And I feel like with my creativity and talent. There is a lot more I can do and what that's kind of leading itself into is what I'm finding is like being a creative director of some sort. Or I had this idea of like maybe starting my own production company where I can allow talented, you know, Queer people to create, just to create and have platforms to create. That would be the ultimate dream. I think Jason has a bright and very fabulous future ahead of him, not just in drag but in wherever his creativity takes him. I'm currently working on a one woman show that's going to be premier at this festival called the short and sweet festival. It's going to be a ten minute piece of my character of Selena and this ten minute theatrical monolog and drag basically like this ten minute monolog and it's it's this whole it's this whole show. It's it just met with my writer yesterday and we're writing it together. But basically it's in a world where Jlo is looking for there there's a nationwide casting call for the jlo movie and they're looking for young Jlo and Selena citties thinks she's the part that candidate, I mean my maiden my my mom's maiden name is Lopez. I mean it's it was written for me, right. So that's the whole concept. Then you see her. That's basically the show. SELENA is titties is here to stay and she's here to shake drag up like you've never seen. Of course, until you get your shit together and go see her a okay, so you can find miss titties and MISSOLINA as titties. On Sunday, the twenty five, at the w hotel in Hollywood there's a jazz night. It's at ten eleven PM show. I go out there and I turn it out for the straight people in the Hollywood. And then on Monday night, the following night, I'm at show girls at Mickey's and West Hollywood. Showtime ten PM. Come get your reservations. Baby, see these titties. Be Sure to follow her so you don't miss a single post. You can follow me on Instagram at at stities. That's es titties. That's right, cities. What does self expression mean to you? Maybe not all of us are artists or even interested in a career...

...in the arts, but it doesn't change the fact that each decision we make every day reflects both who we want others to see and who we are inside. Sometimes those two things are out of sync with each other when we're feeling unhappy or depressed. Maybe it's because the you you're pretending to be on the outside isn't the you you truly are on the inside. I can bet that if you let your own version of expression be in sync with who you are on the inside, you'll start to see the world get a whole lot brighter and find yourself feeling a lot happier. Maybe you express yourself through drag, or maybe it's acting or writing, painting, business, fitness, math or science. There are no limitations to the things you can use to explore and express who you are, because, as we Paul said, we're all born naked and the rest is drag. On those days you're having trouble feeling like you matter, remember it's all drag. If you don't like your outfit, change it and be the queen you were born to be. LGBTQ plus you is brought to you by Straw hut media. If you like the show, don't forget to rate US ON APPLE PODCASTS and be sure to leave us a review. If you'd like to check out more of our great shows. Give us a look at Straw Hut Mediacom. The show can be found all across social media at pride and you can find me on social at Leavi chambers. Our producers are will sterling and Ryan Tillotson. COPYWRITTEN, engineered and edited by will sterling. Those fellows can be found at will sterling underscore and at Ryan Tillotson. Will see you next week.

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