The Ins and Outs of Booty Beauty With Dr. Evan Goldstein
PRIDE
PRIDE

Episode · 3 years ago

The Ins and Outs of Booty Beauty With Dr. Evan Goldstein

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Let’s talk about butts. This week I’m joined by gay proctologist and "hole" enthusiast, Dr. Evan Goldstein. Knowledge will be spread. Jokes will be cracked. Instagrams will be plugged. Be sure to follow Dr. Goldstein on IG. Also be sure to follow @bespokesurgical and @thefuturemethod! Your host is Levi Chambers, co-founder of Gayety. Follow the show and keep up with the conversation @Pride. Want more great shows from Straw Hut Media? Check out or website at strawhutmedia.com. Your producers are Levi Chambers, Maggie Boles, Ryan Tillotson and Edited by Sebastian Alcala Have an interesting LGBTQ+ story to share? We might feature U! Email us at lgbtq@strawhutmedia.com. *This podcast is not affiliated with Pride Media. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Straw media. When's the last time you had an honest conversation about sex? If you're overdue, you're in luck, because we're going to spend today's episode talking with Gay proctologist Dr Evan Goldstein about sex, specifically anal sex. So if it's important to you to have great, healthy, fun sex involving your partner's butt or yours, today's episode of pride is for you. Be advised, though, we will be going into deep detail. After all, how can you talk about healthy sex if you're afraid to analyze it head on or, in this case, from behind? Dr Goldstein and I will talk about Doucheing, Lube, enemas and, ultimately, how being open, honest and educated about our health makes for better sex and healthier relationships. Will even look at a few photos, from the pristine to the weather. So hold onto your butts, listeners, this is going to be fun. I'm leavy chambers...

...and this is pride. Can you introduce yourself? Sure? I am doctor and and Goldstein, N Anal Surgeon, both here in Beverly Hills and New York, which is where I started. In Two thousand and ten Dr Goldstein founded bespoke surgical a first of its kind health practice specializing in queermen's sexual health and wellness. He started in New York and expanded to La in two thousand and sixteen, but before he found his calling he was in the closet married to a woman and then sure exactly where to focus his practice. And I chose to go into cardiac surgery and I was miserable. I hated it.

Everybody was dying and I was like, what is this? And I'm finally out, I'm happy. I'm with my current partner, Andy, and I said, who's actually providing medicine to the gay community? And I started to look around and I was like wow, it's interesting. Nobody is actually doing that. And the reality to me was, well, we're in such a new space for medicine. How do we work in the surgical world to figure out how do we take care of communities and how do we do it better? How do we educate? How do we know what procedures are the right procedures to be done? How do we instill empowerment into communities? And because I was kind of feeling empowered myself, I said I want to take this on as a mission, and that was what spawned bespoke surgical it took around eight years to get things up and running in his New York office. He spent a lot of time engaging with the gay community and working to understand his patient's needs and wants so that he could, as he says, make booties...

...better. And people were coming to me from all over injured or not knowing the right ways to engage or having problems with their partners and trying to figure out how do we put that all together and surgically treat that so people can get better and engage the way that they want to. So back then you identified as straight. Before all of this, I guess. I mean I was looking back and say worth. I mean I was always going back and forth. I mean, once you're into penis, I mean I think you're always into it. No, but with that said, it was, you know, at the time I could be fluid. I mean I think at the time it was really important for me to be with her. It was a symbiotic relationship between the two of us and it helped her get to where she was and it also helped me. And I think obviously that needed to end because it wasn't fair on that accord for her, but it brought me into a really amazing space of my life. I met Andy, who's my...

...current partner now fourteen years we have two boys together and I'm able to kind of create this new niche of surgical science specifically for the gay man, which I which I really think is so awesome. It's allows me to get up every day, meet people like you and communicating, use kind of social media and popular press to really start talking about these issues that were so closeted for so many years. And I think one of the interesting things when you think about HIV per se we've currently right now, our generation is actually the first generation of out gay men living life, and that is such an interesting thing when you think about it, because there's so much responsibility for that, because nobody actually knows what that means or what it is to be an out gay man in two thousand and one thousand nine hundred and twenty. Specifically from an...

...education perspective, science perspective, from a life perspective, relationship perspective, and so me trying to use bespoke surgical and now future method, and we'll go into that, to really empower all of us to say hey, this is where we are, this is who we are, and how do we now make sure that we're having fruitful engagements, whether that's physical or mental or whatnot, and making sure that everything is as risk free as we possibly can make it? Something we should probably get out of the way now is our terminology. There are a lot of words we could use to talk about the topic at hand, but it doesn't feel quite right to say anus or wreckt them. Those are two clinical asshole is okay, but maybe a little crude, but whole feels a bit childish, so we're going to settle on Dr Goldstein's preferred terminology, whole. So do you actually ask people like? Do you say whole hole? I say whole a lot. I like whole. Don't...

...you like all? I know you like whole. I really is really fun. As you can probably guess, Dr Goldstein sees a lot of holes, both in person at his private practice and in photos from current and perspective patients. When he receives a photo, he always asks if the photo was taken with an iphone. Dr Goldstein says there's a twenty five percent standard deviation of error with the older iphones, meaning he can't necessarily tell if what he's looking at is accurate, which led us to another very important bit of terminology. So I get a lot of Belfies all the time. That's what you call them, bellies. Well, we didn't know what to call it because, like it is then ass selfie or it's like a butt selfie. So like always, that a belfy. So we're going to Hashtag that, for sure. Send Me Your belfies. And so you get all of them random and some of them are like really amazing and some of them are not so amazing.

And then sometimes I ask people to send them to me post surgery if there's a complication or something like that, so I could see what's going on. Why are you laughing? Because it's nuts. Can you really quick? Can you define what is a Belfy? Define it, okay, a belfy is an ass selfie and I see a lot of ass every single day and people send me their ass all the time. Is it good? Is it not? What does it look like? Things like that, and it's really hard to do a Belfy. How do you do them? I kind of I think it just depends upon where I am. If I'm in the bathroom and I'm looking like you know, then it's I think it's under the legs. Is probably the easiest. Yeah, but again, I told you. That's why I asked you about your new iphone, because the old iphones, they erroneously make yourss twenty five percent worse than what it is. So that was I was asking about your new iphone. Great for the Belfy, great for the bell. That is a commercial for iphone right there. I think...

...it would be gone a billboard right on sunset shot with the iphone eleven pro from Oh my, it would work. It would work. Where is Tim Cook when you need him? Right? He would probably love the Belfy. I think he would. Tim Cook, we're talking to you, Dm us, on Instagram, if you want to get in on this belfy action. It's a great opportunity for a partnership. Okay, so back to the backside. I asked Dr Goldstein to share a photo of an unhealthy hole with me for scientific purposes. That's a bad one. You see that? Is that a normal looking asshole? Do you think that is? Are you sure that's what that is? That is what happened to that one. This is like long standing hemorrhoids, sitting flying, pushing wrong pooping wrong sex. Is that fucked up? Yeah, that looks like Calli far, yes, but that's not war. So, like a lot of that would be in thought warts...

...and then I fixed him. This is like right, post surgery. You see, much more normal. What do you think? Prettier? I much prettier. Right, it's getting there. So I hope I never have the first one, I know. But now he's got a normal hall, great and he's happy. Look at that. You are changing lives, trying one hole at a time. As the pre eminent expert and thought leader in the field of Gay proctology, Dr Goldstein's commitment is to spread education and awareness about queermen sexual health and to eliminate the stigma attached to it. He serves as the advocate sexual health expert, is a regular contributor to gaze with kids and has been featured in vice out magazine and refinery twenty nine. I think the issue comes down to is when you look at gay culture and sexual activity, it's so different than any other sexual activity that's out there, and the reality...

...is that most non gay proctologists don't understand an no engagement from a sexual perspective, and it's not that I blame them. They weren't trained in it, they don't take it up the ASS, they don't give it up the ASS and they just don't get it right. And when you're analyzing sex, especially annally, it's very traumatic. Right and we talked about like preparing for sex, engaging in X, and how do you take care of things from post sex perspective? And nobody talks about gay sex, nobody understands it, nobody puts it out there to say, Hey, this is what people are doing. How do we support those communities with the education curriculums so that they can minimize risk and then products to substantiate that? And that is the difference. A lot of old school proctology does not take into account whether or not you...

...want to engage annually. It only cares about are you shitting the right way, and that mentality screws so many of the community because there's not enough gay proctologist for people that are talking about it or understand it to actually perform these surgeries that I see so many people from all over the world. Second, third opinions. They've had surgeries, it's failed, they still can't engage the way that they want to and I tell people all the time, if you are at a proctologist office and they do not ask you how you identify, or do you identify and do if they don't ask you, how do you engage and they don't talk about sexual practices, walk out, because the reality is that they have no concept of where you want to go. And so that's where the empowerment of what we're trying to do is to educate everybody to say hey, I now know what is expected and what's should be standard of...

...care as a gay man or as someone that engages annually, and then now be able to get the appropriate treatments. What I do is not difficult. A lot of it is actually the same thing from a proctology perspective. But it's also then knowing from the post operative course, how are we going to get people where they want to go? Is it they want fingers, toys? Did they want cocks? What do they want to they want fisting? How far are we going to push this? Because, at the end of the day, yes, it's a hole, right, we talked about holes, but it's supposed to be for pooping, right, and now we're using it as a conduit for sexual expression. Expression and for great sensations, but it's also quite traumatic to do that. And how are we going to now create safe spaces for people to talk about it and then also have solutions so...

...that people are able to actually go back to what they want or start what they want? Wow, okay, yeah, compose yourself. Sorry the my previous meetings with you or not. That's colorful. If you've gotten a big giggly throughout this episode, you're not alone. It isn't often that I get to have a frank discussion about balloon knots. It was hard enough coming up with a term to use, and obviously I haven't stuck to it completely. So take a minute, compose yourself and when we come back we'll hear about Dr Goldstein's three pillars of whole health. The bespoke surgical philosophy has three pillars of sexual health and wellness, prevention, restoration and reconstruction. One is prevention. Is How are we creating the education in the curriculum so people do not injure themselves right? Prevention also looks at how do we risk assess and bring...

...people's risks down from an STD perspective. Now there's a lot of prophylactic stuff that people can do with the use of doxycycling prophylactically to lower your risk of stds, similar from a prep perspective of using Truvada and soon too be some others to minimize risk, and just analyzing sex practices so that you know, hey, there's a place that's nonjudgmental, that does not create any bias, that you are able to say this is what I enjoy or this is what I want to do. How are we now going to make sure you're doing it as safely as possible and also understanding that what you do impacts the community, and so knowing that if we're able to treat you or bring your risk down, we're obviously going to be bringing the risk down of the community, and I think that that's what's so important of all of this, because it...

...could be you know, you're at hole I'm in or someone else's whole I'm in, and at the end of the day it's a it's a compounding variable. So from a prevention also we look at HPV, which is super common in our community, to preventing anal cancers and we do a lot of annual visa.

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