Stripping for Straight Guys With Jake DuPree
PRIDE
PRIDE

Episode · 3 years ago

Stripping for Straight Guys With Jake DuPree

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Burlesque, in its many forms, has been popular for a long time, not just since the 20s and 30s like you probably know, but all the way back into the 1800s. In the 90s, there was a burlesque revival and it has been going strong ever since. My guest today is a burlesque dancer, yes. But if you’re not super caught up on the LA burlesque scene, you may have also seen him as Glitter Fantasy, Cosmopolitan’s first ever Unicorn Correspondent. Or leading a barre class at Equinox. You may have even seen him presiding over the West Hollywood Halloween Carnaval as the Queen of Carnaval in 2017. Today, we’ll talk with Jake about burlesque, drag, stripping and what can happen when you do a back handsprings in stilettos. Be sure to follow Jake on IG. Your host is Levi Chambers, co-founder of Gayety. Follow the show and keep up with the conversation @Pride. Want more great shows from Straw Hut Media? Check out or website at strawhutmedia.com. Your producers are Levi Chambers, Maggie Boles, Ryan Tillotson and Edited by Sebastian Alcala Have an interesting LGBTQ+ story to share? We might feature U! Email us at lgbtq@strawhutmedia.com. *This podcast is not affiliated with Pride Media. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Straw hut media. Burlesque in its many forms has been popular for a long time, not just since the S and Thir S, like you probably know, but all the way back into the eighteen hundreds. In the s there was a burlesque revival and it has been going strong ever since. My guest today is a burlesque answer, but if you're not super caught up on the La burless scene, you may have also seen him as blitter fantasy cosmopolitan's first ever unicorn correspondent. You may have even seen him presiding over the West Hollywood Halloween Carnival as the Queen of Carnival in two thousand and seventeen. Today we'll talk with Jake duprie about burlesque, drag stripping and what can happen when you do back hand springs in Stillettos. I'm leave by chambers and this is pride. Jake depri is relatively new to the burlesque scene. He's only been performing since September of last year, but he already has a signature number. I put a spell on you and it is, to say the least, spell binding. Hi, I'M J DUPRI I'm thirty one years old. I live here in Los Angeles, California, and I am a burlesque dancer. Jake his dance professionally for years and he had been inching slowly toward burlesque for a while. The final stepping stone before he dove into burlesque was an amateur drag competition at revolver in West Hollywood. But even though he won that competition, drag didn't feel quite right. I thought that's what I wanted. I now realized that I don't. I'm not interested in female illusion. I just liked the glamor aspect of it. It was sort of away from me to it's kind of like a conduit for me to find how I expressed myself. So in the competition I did like what I do now, like boy hair launderie, strippy, strippy, strippy, and so it was very non traditional for like a amateur drag competition, and I went throughout all the weeks and then I ended up winning the whole thing. But in those in that competition I reached out to this bur lest performer I had seen a lot because I've always been a big burless fan, and she does this number. Her name's Miss Miranda, and she were it does this number she's like covered in Chili peppers and she pours hot sauce down her leg and makes a guy lick it off, and I remember that in my head. I was like God, that's so hot. So I wanted to do something like that and I reached out to her. I was like this number is inspired by you, not thinking she would ever even say anything back, and so I sent her the number and then she sent me this huge email back that was like you're amazing. She was like usually when people do my numbers or say they're inspired by me, they're not that great. She's like you're a really good I was so...

...shocked because I've been a fan of hers for a long time. Jake and Miss Miranda kept in touch throughout the competition and became friends. Then two weeks after his win, Jake saw that Dee de vontise was holding auditions for her blessed show, von Foley's, at the Hollywood rose abult theater. So he went and I've had seen auditions just in the past because I had, you know, been dancing professionally for a while. So I had seen auditions in the past for her stuff and it was usually for backup dancers, because there's not really any boys in her show that do that. There's like one, but he he's got like that spot on lock, but everybody else is just like a backup dancer or they pick up her laenderie or costumes. And not that I wasn't interested in that, but I was like I obviously wanted to be in the forefront and I went to the audition, learned the coup let, the whole combooners. One of those moments where I was like everybody in the room stopped to watch me and I was so funny. I was telling my friend this last night and I was like, I don't I don't want, I don't mean that to sound like cocky or anything, but it was like the one time in my life I felt in my power and it was so cool being in that room because I was just in my laundrey with my boy hair like makeup, doing my thing, learning this dance and I was like I knew I had I just knew, like this is my moment. For some reason, I have no idea. And then a few weeks went by and I didn't hear anything from that audition. I was like, Oh God, I did not get it, so you're completely full of yourself. And then two weeks later I got an email and we had to go meet with her and it was literally just like the two of US sitting here, just right by each other in the Rosebut hotel. She was like you're going to be doing my Martini lass number and I just cried in front of her because she's like my idol and she's been that way for years. I've just always respected her and thought she was amazing, and then that kind of set me on this path of where I am now. Even though Jake was born and raised in Arkansas, which we all know is not exactly a bastion of liberalism, luckily he came from a supportive and progressive family. Luckily my parents are super, super liberal and a lot of their friends are very liberal and I was lucky enough to be around that. But on the outside of that it's extremely conservative, very red, which is fine if that's what you feel and believe, but it just is hard when you're somebody who's like considered different, because everybody wants to point it out to you. Yeah, high school was really tough for me. I have a twin brother and he's also gay and we both were in gymnastics like all growing up. And then that's just not typically what's considered cool in my hometown because it's very football based. Yeah, so I was definitely like always wanted to get out of my hometown. That's always like my goal since I was a little kid. was always I wanted to move to New York. That was like always my thing. After high school, Jake left home and attended the Savannah College of Art and design in Georgia. He didn't go to college with the intention of becoming a dancer.

In fact, the scholarship to received was for fashion and painting. I found dance there, which was so funny. So not until my Sophomore Year of college that I find dance and then sort of change my life. was like the piece of the puzzle, but had always always been missing and I love that. Oh, and I have a little brother too. He's in dental school. It's so cute. And your twin is a my twin is a news reporter and he works in Austin now and he just won his first emmy this past year. That's a much. is so cool. Congrats to him. Yeah, I like I always tell people that and he's always like you have to stop leading with that. I'm like, Oh, I have a twin. He won an emmy and like I don't care. I'm like I don't know anybody that has an e me, so I have to brag about you. And it's the guy that's like literally shared a woom with you. Know. Yeah, you're like people will think it's me. Yeah, so I basically when I see it by proxy, I did when an emmy. That's legit. Okay. So then, when did you come out? How was that process? WAS IT IN ARKANSAS? was so I came out when I was in college. I think I was nineteen at the time. I had intern I was in turning in New York City for a casting agency and I was staying in this apartment building and I kept seeing this guy, this really cute guy, like coming in and out to and he lived in the same building and my boss and I went to go see Altra boys off Broadway and that guy was the lead of the show and I was like this is crazy. In the audience is very, very small and like very intimate and there's a point where they the altar boys like they're a boy band. If you're not familiar and they it kind of like the backstreet boys, like low budget backstreet boys, and they play that. They like bring someone on stage and he brought my boss on stage and I was like you know exactly what you're doing and it's definitely working for me. And it was so funny. We ran into each other in at like coming through the apartment. I was coming in, he was leaving, and we were like Oh hey, like I I just saw you like in the show, and then it turned into this saying that was sort of my first like gay experience and then I when I went back to college, I was I went through like sort of a depression and my parents were like what's going on, like you're being so weird and not yourself. I was like do you actually want to know and they were like yeah, tell us, and then I just told him and they were like okay. It was if I think it was like harder for my mom at times because she wanted to have like grandkids and I was like I'm pretty sure out of all your kids, if someone's going to give you grandkids, it'll probably be me, so just back off. But yeah, they're both like super, super supportive. My Dad was is like born and raised in my hometown and he loves, loves what I do. It's like so cool. Jake's parents have never seen him perform or lesque live, but that's going to change soon when they visit to see him perform at the six anniversary show of teas if you please, at the Palace Theater in downtown Los Angeles this November. It's like probably like the show that means the most to me and they're coming to that and I'm super, super excited and I'm like happy that they get to witness it, let just like for the first time, as everybody else will get to. Jake has been a burlesque fan for...

...years and because he once considered becoming a fashion designer, the opportunity to create and curate costumes for himself to dance in is a dream and, true to his glitter surprise Unicorn Alter Ego, there is a lot of sparkle. My costume is definitely a very sparkly anything that's like sparkly, sparkly, sparkly, I love. I mean like I want it to be everywhere, and glitter genuinely is everywhere, in my house, in my car, everything. But I really love there's a lot of boy last performers and they usually kind of allude to more male a more male esthetic, and I kind of like to blur the line where it's like I want my body to look masculine but I want to wear feminine things. So it like really fucks with people. I really like the juxtaposition of that and like the way that I move is very feminine. So it's it's it's screws with people and I think it's what I toward, a lean toward is like more of an androgynous look, and I love like Laingeris sets and like a Thong thigh high stockings. I just love that because it's so classic and kind of like old school in a way, but I like for what I do to kind of have a modern edge to it. Like I love to play with like hats that are not necessarily within the time period of a typical burlesque costume. I just like I just enjoy things that I'm inspired by, just whatever that may be in terms of maybe designers from the past or unways from the past or costumes that I see from old movies back in old Hollywood days. It just depends, but I really love like getting down to like launderie because I just think it's hot and heels and heels always, never a flap. You. I'm like I'm shorter. I'm like five nine, which is, I guess, not Super Short, but I just prefer the height and it just makes me feel like dangerous, like I could legit break my ankle doing this, and I'm a lot of the things I do dance wise aren't traditionally done in heels. So I really like the danger because it's something that people haven't seen before necessarily. And this is not like a dancing shoe heel. It's a full on Stiletto. Yeah, it's a full like my foot can legit just fall out the front, because most people you'll see with like a ankle strap or a closed front. So because it because it holds your foot in the heel. No, and actually had a funny experience. I was just a Nashville last weekend performing and I do a back can spring em act and heels and that sort of like count my eleven o'clock like boom, got you, like I'm off, you know, and I went back and my heel literally launched off my foot and there's a giant sign that had like the venues name on it and I bulls eyed that thing right in the center of it and it started swinging and it literally looked perfect, like it look perfect and I was like this, I need to keep that, but that's the first thing that's ever happened, so I guess it's the first time for everything. You need like projectile shoes. Yeah, I think it's genius. Like boom, it just like and that sign went to swing and I said, this is good. Do you ever...

...worry about wardrobe malfunctions or have you ever had a wardrobe malfunction where you're like, whoop, this t's got a little too teasy? Yeah, I mean it's always a concern because, you I don't Tuck or anything, so I mean things could fall out for sure, but I tried to wear like at least two or three pairs of like underwear, even if it's like a Thong over a thong over a thong, because it just keeps everything in there. That's the biggest worry for me in terms of wardrobe. Wrote Wardrobe Malfunction, but like you know, women it's like often they have to have, you know, like a Tassel or a pasty over there nipple and sometimes that can fall off and I had a friend who was in a show and they want it. One came off and what you're supposed to do is like hold your hand over it and then keep going, but that's so weird, especially if you're dancing, and so she took the other one off and they shut the curtain on her. So it's just like these. There's the there's strange rules, but as also like men don't have to wear nipple covers or pasties or tassels or whatever, because it's like a man's boo. But I don't think. I think if women have to do it, men should do it too, and I always try to like keep mine covered just out of solidarity for the girls. I think that the the funniest thing I've ever had happened in performance is I had had these tea away pants. They came off and I have this bodysuit with like a ribbon and it pulls off and then drops down and I'm like in a Thong underneath it and the ribbon got stuck and I it literally was in the tidy, tiniest, tightest knot I have ever seen. I literally was just like well, it's not coming off. So I just had to do my number with my costume not fully coming off on which is Mozzo, which is so disappointing because it's like you have one job, it's just to take off your clothes and I can't even do that. So it was it was definitely like I feel like everybody that I know has had an experience like that or something doesn't come off and you just have to go with it. But you know, the thing is just sell it and if you know, if you screw up, so what? No one will really know. No one's going to actually care that quy. I didn't he finished his day. He's not naked. Okay, that's terrible. My money back after the break. will learn a little bit more about the history of burlesque and work with Jake to decipher whether or not burlesque is stripping. Burlesque as we know it today has been changing and developing since the s. It began as a performance of comedy, satire, Song and dance, often with elaborate and funny costumes. When burlesque made its way from England to the United States, it transformed even more and became especially focused on female nudity. In the twenties and S, burlesque started to focus more and more on the stripped teas, for lesque has an art form that is all about the art the tea.

So it's not the actual sexual act, it's what's leading up to that or what the illusion of that is. And for me burlesque means empowerment and embodiment of your own body and how you want to express that, and I think it's really cool because so many bodies and different types of people are represented in burlesque and it's celebrated and applauded. There's nothing. You'll never see someone being judged for the way they look or the way that they present. It's always just about full expression of yourself and if it's authentic to you, it's authentic to the audience. So then, what's the difference between burlesque and boylesque is boy. That's just like a fun Boi lesque, as the difference between burlesque and boilesque is that it's a boy doing burlesque, like that's it. It's just a term. Okay, it's not like there's not a separation really at all, but I will say that it is. It's a definitely a smaller group in the boylesque sector, because it sounds so scientific, the boilest sector. It's like it's just there's just fewer boys doing it, and so I hope to change that. So a lot of the burleste stuff started back in the earth in like Ni s, like prohibitionary era, and they it was like there's Menskis, there was all those houses that basically we're stripper like houses, but of course they were just giving the art of the teas. And of course there's Gypsy Roselie, who kind of change the way that burlesque artist are perceived as like an actual formidable talent and art form, and I think that she was able to open a lot of doors that a lot of people weren't able to for some reason. I think it mainly was her personality too. And of course you have people like May West and, who was always very body and very open about her body and her sexuality. And of course you have like people like Marilyn Monroe who allude to ber less but never were strippers. But yeah, it's just a long line of people who are artistic and some of them, you know, fell on hard times and had to figure out a way to make it happen for themselves, and that just is what happened and like was a way for them to make money to do you consider burlesque stripping? I mean, I don't think there's. I know at this is like a really contentious point of topic for a lot of people. I think that I don't think that bur lesque artists are better than strippers. I don't think shippers are better than burlesque artists. I think it's just I think it's all in the same family for sure. What you choose to do with that is what you do, and I don't have any I think that they're pretty close. Yeah, yeah, so would you say I'm a stripper? Yeah, I like saying I'm a stripper and I know there's a funny saying that de Deavuntiz has, or she's like I don't want to be called a stripper. I think it's I like the way it sounds because it's kind of like shocking or you know, people have like such preconceived notions about strippers, quote unquote, and I think I think it's fun to just say it and just be like yeah, I'm stripper. I like to say I'm...

...a high class stripper or like a glorified stripper, because burlesque, like, when I think of that, when someone says like, Oh, I do burlesque this. I'm sure this is not like what the community, the Burleste dancing community, thinks, but I always think of like Christina Aguilary in the song which she's like it's burlesque. Yeah, what's so funny about the burlesque movie is, like I they're not. They don't actually ever take off clothes. It's literally just sexy dancing and lingerie. Like the art of burlesque is the removal of clothing and in that movie they don't really ever move take off clothes. It's just sexy dancing, which is fine. I love that movie because it's so terrible and great, but it's not burlesque. There is an art and a skill to taking off your clothes and doing it gracefully. To every one of you who has forgotten to unbutton the top button of your shirt and gotten stuck trying to pull it over your head, you can still be a burlesque dancer. To all of you who have fallen over trying to work your foot out of the tiny leg hole in your skinny jeans, you too can become a burlesque dancer. You may never get to the level of Deda Vonte's, but what's important is that I believe in you. It's like it's really funny to see how people take off their clothes and it was really awesome learning from de Devantie's how she takes off her clothes, because she is like truly a master at it and if you watch her performances, every moment she has on stage is a picture, like if someone took a picture, it would look perfect at any second of her performance, which is masterful. It's she's one of the only people that I've seen that can pull that off. But the weirdest, the hardest thing for me is when you're you have to make it look as effortless as possible and there's some things that are a little clunkier to take off, like your corsets and stuff like a lot of people have zippers, which is great because it can just slide right off, but if you have the hook and I it can kind of get stuck and you have to, you know, figure out a cute way to take it off. But for gloves, I like to start from the top of the glove which is like up by my elbow and then pull it down and pull it over my head and take it off. But a lot of people do it individually, a by fingers. You can like grab a finger by your mouth and like pull the glove off and then do all this like play with your mouth, and it's you know, there's just like so many ways to take off articles of clothing, and what I like is when somebody like figures out a new way to take off an article of clothing. Like there's this one act, frankie fit takes Franky fictitious as her name and she just won the burlesque call of fame this year, which is so such a huge high on her in the less community. And she this not the act that she won with, but this is the one I just saw of her, and she was in a lion costume and she literally pulls these ropes and then that costume just falls off her and it's a different costume underneath. It is literally witchcraft, and I was like this is so cool. So there's just so many ways to take off clothes, which is like such a funny thing to say because you think like when you're taking off your shirt. When you're taking off your pants, it's like there's only one way to do it. You're wrong, like they're snaps, there's zippers, all kinds of things that can remove and be cool and interesting. Okay, so actually love that you talked about...

...the glove, because I feel like we just gave listeners like this is how you take off a glove like a pro. Yeah, well, what's so? And also when taking off stockings is really that was like the part. Like one of the coolest things I learned from deed of on Ti's was how to take off her stocking, because she there's a point in there's a video on my instagram. If you look into see the Martini last number that I do for her, and you like go down your leg, you're stroking up your leg and then you some people can like lick their finger to wet it to go underneath the stocking, because the stockings that she used, your traditional stockings, are not stretchy. They're just like nylon fabric, and you pull it down your leg and then you take your leg, but you do you pull it off your foot, but you keep the end of it in your hand and you pull it around your back and then try to bring your foot to the back of your head to pull the stocking off. It's so sick and she makes it look effortless and I try remember to try it the first time and I just looked so uncomfortable and I'm pretty graceful and I can make some things look good with that was that was probably the hardest thing. Every time I would do that part of the number, it would give me like anxiety because she just makes it look so good and that's very that's a signature move of hers. And so to learn that I was literally in my apartment just like trying to take off stockings above my head all day. Yeah, for like night I would just practice because I wanted to be as good as possible and I literally had a week to learn this number and she's had her a lifetime to do it. So and make it great. Yeah, and make it look so easy, s and it's like it's not easy at all. Jake's style of gender bending and drawgyness burlesque is new and still pretty uncommon. People attending bur less shows sometimes aren't expecting to see a man perform a stripped tease in women's launder the other day jake posted a clip to his instagram of a performance where he stopped and straddle the straight guy in the audience. But the guy was a good sport and he seemed pretty okay with it. So and for the most part, I love performing for straight audiences specifically because I think that they've never seen something like what I do and that's really fun to watch their faces, because literally everyone just stops and his like mouth the gape and it's like so fun to see and play with and just be like, Oh, I'm gonna screw you up. And there was a I did this like many tour called party like Gatsby, and we went to like four cities in the US and then two in Canada and I like host of the show and performed, and I remember here. We did a performance here in La it was our third show, I think, and I would like sometimes during when other acts are going or there's like the band playing, I would go up and like interact with the audience. So I would go up to the balcony a lot because we can't traditionally go up there, so I would go up there and just dance with people and just be silly and take pictures, and there was this straight dude and he was little. He literally I put his hand in my face and was like no, and I was I can't rememb what I said something back because my mouth can get the best of me whenever I'm like in a situation. But I said something and then everybody around him just like mouth. I can't remember what I said. I should remember that. I have to go back and like think. But yeah,...

I definitely got him together. He needed it. I just think it's when people have such a strong reaction to stuff. I'm like, you really need this or there's something that you're hiding, like if you're not, I'm not doing anything bad, or and what I do is not anything bad. So why are you having that stronger reaction? Right? Must be something that you don't want to talk about. If you're that confident, you'd be like this is silly. Yeah, yeah, and most were you play into it or whatever. Yeah, exactly like them. The Post that you're talking about where I was like straddling that straight man and like literally just like on him. You know, you just sat there and like let me do it, like he does, like not going to touch me or anything. But it's so funny. I've actually had a lot of straight couples after my show like proposition me, which is so funny. I'm just like you. No, I don't want either one of you like that's not my job, not my responsibility. So No, but it's fun. It's fun that people respond to it and are open to it, but it's definitely a character of me, not who I actually am. So there's, it's there's, it's a persona. Yeah, you're absolutely I think that people assume in a lot of the burlesque people that I work with they all they I. We talked about this a lot, is that people assume that we're sluts or whos, which is fine, even if if you are, because you know, we all have our moments. But it's a lot of the people that in this form, art form, they do it for themselves, like they're doing it because that's the way they want to move and it's not necessarily to attract somebody or seduce somebody or whatever. It's literally just for us and how we choose to express ourselves. So how would you describe yourself? Not on stage versus and on stage. Well, I have no interest in like doing that, like in the bedroom anything like that. I just think no, it's too much work and you can't afford me. But I I think for me it because I get to express myself so fully across the spectrum. I can be as normal and as chill as I want to be in my real life and not have to do anything or showboat or push trying to express myself, because I think when I used to, I used to before I started doing this, I would always like be like, I'm not people aren't seeing the like full range of me. Well, now they see everything and anything and all of it. So that feels really good that I can live in a chill fashion as compared to that which is like, oh the top, sexualized like which and I like that that I get to do both. I think for me, the one of the hardest things to like the barrier to break through, is both in the drag world people are like Oh, you're not a drag queen, like why, why are you here, and people literally coming up to be being like you're not a drag queen, like literally saying that to me in a bar, and I'm like I'm not trying to be so thank you, like okay, you found me out. Thank you so much. And then...

...in the bur less world. Sometimes boys aren't necessarily getting the same opportunities as women, but in a way I think that's a good thing, because women deserve the opportunities to and probably have not been able to get as many opportunities just based from being a woman, just from like entertainment standpoint, like and also history standpoint. It's like women aren't afforded the same opportunities in a big way that men are just more easily leaned to. And I think for me it's like I I want to because I've come up pretty quickly in this world and like made a name for myself quickly, and I think that that is a male privilege thing and I think it's because it's like, Oh, we've never seen a boy do it like this, and it like there's women that do a lot of stuff that I do, and probably better, and I think that it's important to acknowledge that and to help promote that too. Yeah, and this is kind of a space that they own and have owned. I mean it's a it's a female dominated art form, which is amazing, and that's why I think I respond so well to it, is because women are truly driving it. Jake is fortunate to have one of those formidable women as a mentor missed on a hood was the choreographer of Jake's De Dea Vontie's audition and she produces the show that Jake's parents are coming out for in November. Tease if you please. Jake has been going to Donna Hood's Ber less shows for five of the six years that they've been putting them on. I remember specifically seeing her perform and I was she's a dancer, Dancer, and like it was really cool because a lot of a lot of her less performers don't come from like the strict dance world where they're like turning and doing all kinds of like actual, like actual, actually dancing, and with her I was just blown away by her and it was first person I've ever seen perform on stage. DRE was like I can do that, like I saw myself in with like doing what she does, and that's what inspired me in the to now like get text on my phone from her every time she pops up my phone. I tell her this every time and, like such a Nerd, I'm like I get genuinely excited that you text me because I can't believe it that's so funny, though, and she's been like the biggest cheerleader for me and we actually did a duet for teas, if you please, like for the past like a few months, and it is it is so we are getting to like dance with her and collaborate with her and like come up with the choreography with her, and I just respect her so much and she's who I want to emulate and be like, because she's a Badass and she really makes things happen in the burlesque world and doesn't wait for other people to do it for her. So you get a little star strong. Yeah, and it's like I still it's she's like the nicest, coolest person and it's just fun. I get to call her my friends. I love it. No matter what it is, doing what you love has its ups and downs. Nothing can ever truly be all glitter and rainbows in real life, but for Jake dancing burlesque, it's actually pretty close, outside of the obvious life...

...changing moment of dancing the Martini glass routine. For Dida vontee's, his highest moment was in Calgary earlier this year. I was hosting the party like Gatsby show and I did my number at the very end of the show and literally the entire audience was on their feet screaming for five minutes and I had never I had never experienced anything like that where the entire place was like so invested in what I did, and it was just so cool to see. I don't know, it was just really cool to see how how much hard work I have put in and how it came off and got appreciated like that. was. That's amazing to be able to finally feel that way. It was awesome like that. I will always remember that and I cried on stage. I was like this is it was just like very overwhelming to take in because I had I had basically been waiting to do something like this for my entire life and never allowed myself to do it and I was like the fact that I get to and all these people are cheering for me, and mainly straight audience. It was incredible. I will always remember that. And I think the lowest of lows. I think it mainly has to do with like bookings, like there's a few places here in West Hollywood that refused to book me because I'm not a drag performer, and that kind of sucks because there's been other people that have performed at these places that do sort of what I do and I just but you know, everyone's going to be open to what you do and not one's going to be a fan, and I think that's okay. But it's just hard sometimes in you're like, I work my butt off and I will put on a good show and I know people, I can bring people in to see this, and so, you know, that's a that's one of the hard parts is just trying to break down these doors that seem to be like super close to you. Yeah, that you can see how that would be very frustrating. Yeah, it's just I mean I just try to do everything that I can to open those doors, even if it's like beating it until it I'm black and blue. But at a certain point you I have to like stepway and be like, you know what, maybe not for me. Other opportunities will come and that could change over time. Yeah, which I hope. So I think that be awesome because some of these are on my like goal list. So we'll see. So what advice do you have for like the eighteen year old closeted kid back in Arkansas? Who follows you on instagram and things like. I want to do that. I mean, I just think it's cool to see this out there, because if I had seen what I do now as a kid, I would have been like I see myself, like there I am, and I think that that's really cool to be able to be in a place where I am traveling and, you know, trying to get my name out there more and more and more and, you know, do everything that I can. But it's really cool to be able to feel like I'm on the stead decline, incline to to the success that I want for myself, and I think in that...

...it's nice for other people to be able to witness that and be like, Oh my God, just because he's doing something completely different, shows that, you know, you can't make a living and you can't have a career and you can have all the accolades that you want because of who you are. And so I hope that whoever, if there's somebody out there that's closeted and following me or sees me and sees what I do, I think that would be so sick to be able to inspire somebody and I hope I want somebody to be better, bigger, more amazing than I could even do and like to be able to see that would be really, really cool. So I hope that in some way. I think that drag race has done a lot for the drag community, but I think there's a lot of representation on the spectrum that aren't necessarily drag Queens. I think that that it's our time. Our time is coming, like in terms of seeing other things besides drag be celebrated or lesque. Yeah, and I'm ready for that. I'm so ready for that. I'm so ready to see like shot, like shows, truly like a ton of shows dedicated to boys doing this, and I think there's a few. There's a few, but I want more. You can and should follow Jake on Instagram at Jake dupri and watch some of the amazing videos he shared of him dancing. You can see that video of him straddling the straight guy and you can check out how he looks in a corset. Jake, not the straight guy. And of course next month is the big show and who knows, maybe you'll end up sitting right next to Jake's parents. The next big show that I'm going to be doing is tease, if you please, and it's at the Palace theater downtown. A thousand seats and then all the seats have been going very quickly and all the people in the show. The numbers are bigger, they're more dramatic, there's more production value. It's going to be epic like. This is the show that I have been wanting to do for a long time and my number is inspired by a cat. I'll just say that the show is on Saturday November, sixteen. Go to teas if you pleasecom for tickets and more INFO. Thanks for listening. Pride is a production of Straw hut media. If you like the show, leave us a rating and to review on Apple, podcast, spotify or wherever you're tuning in from. Share us with your friends, subscribe and follow us on Instagram, facebook and twitter at pride. Yep, it's at pride that easy. You can follow me at me by chambers. Pride is produced by me, me by chambers, maggy bowls and Ryan Tillottson edited by Sebastian. I'll Coholm I love cats, I just don't have got eleven of them. Yep,.

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