Hollywood Doesn't Suck With Harvey Guillén
PRIDE
PRIDE

Episode · 3 years ago

Hollywood Doesn't Suck With Harvey Guillén

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Janelle Monae. Neil Patrick Harris. Colton Haynes. Laverne Cox. There are so many inspiring LGBTQ actors and performers in entertainment today. Now, more than ever before, there are opportunities for queer people to tell stories and build successful careers, like my guest today, Harvey Guillén. Yes, we’ve come a long way, Hollywood. Even so, there’s a lot of work to be done. But if we can work even half as hard as Harvey worked toward achieving his dream of being an actor, I think we’ll be off to a good start. Be sure to follow Harvery on IG Your host is Levi Chambers, co-founder of Gayety. Follow the show and keep up with the conversation @Pride. Want more great shows from Straw Hut Media? Check out or website at strawhutmedia.com. Your producers are Levi Chambers, Maggie Boles, Ryan Tillotson and Edited by Sebastian Alcala Have an interesting LGBTQ+ story to share? We might feature U! Email us at lgbtq@strawhutmedia.com. *This podcast is not affiliated with Pride Media. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Straw hut media, Janelle Monet, Neil Patrick, Harris, Sarah Poulson, Colton Haynes, Le Verne coots. There are so many inspiring lgbtq actors and performers in entertainment today. Now more than ever, there are opportunities for Queer people to tell stories and build successful careers, like my guest today, Harvey Geeing. But diversity in Hollywood has been hard worn in the past. Tinseltown was not a friendly place to be queer. Some actors came out only to family and friends because they were afraid of what could happen to their careers. In the Nineteen Thir S, actor William Haynes was given a choice to either marry a woman or forfeit his profession. He chose his partner. In the Nineteen S, tabloids outed or blackmailed actors like Van Johnson and Rock Hudson. It was only twenty two years ago that Ellen Degeneres famously came out on her television show. Yes, Hollywood has come a long way. Even so, there's still a lot to be done. But if we can work even half as hard as harvey worked towards achieving his dream to be an actor, we'll be off to a good start. I'm me by chambers and from Strahu media. This is pride. What are you willing to do to achieve your dreams? Would you collect cans and bottles to pay for acting classes? Would you move to the other side of the world for a role in a musical? When Harvey Gian decided he wanted to be an actor, there was literally nothing that could get in his way. Hey, I'm Harvegian and I'm an actor and advocate. You may have seen Harvey on nickelodeon's the Thunderman's sci Fi's the...

...magician's or the two thousand and thirteen movie, the internship with Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughan, but most recently you probably know him as Guillermo, the human familiar on the popular fx series what we do in the shadows. I feel like you're like when someone says like I want to be a working actor. HMM, you are the dream because you work a lot, you know. So funny people say that all the time. They're like, you're working actor, always constantly working. I we see that and it's funny because I think because my friend Jes see Malton, who said this Wi lecture and her dad said that they love the phrase overnight success, but it's not overnight success. It's been like working at it for years and years and when you make it see seamless, that's the job. And I think also Keikis at those key pommer, she said that the job is to make it look effortless, but you don't see how much you're hustling, you know, behind closed doors, like every everything I book. You don't see the fifty things I don't book because I'm not advertising the fifty failures. You know, I'm like promoting the actual win. And so I would say when you book a role, like a major role, like every time I get a series regular, it's like winning the lottery. And now if you're lucky enough to win the lottery several times in one lifetime, that's that's amazing. Sometimes it takes a lifetime to figure out what you want to do with your life. Other Times it's evident from a very young age I wanted to be an actor. When I was six years old, I was watching Annie on TV, I thought was a TV show because I didn't know that it was a movie, and I was watching the the the TV show called Annie and I saw these kids who were poor and running around with mobs and dancing and singing and I looked over at mom and I said, mom, I want to be that, I want to be an orphan, and she looked at me like yeah, and I was like I want to be an orphan and she is like it says local, because you crazy, you know, single mom. Immigrant ye out like it was just yeah, I want to be that. She's like no, no, so not thought. As are actors. I said, well, I woant to be an actor. It's like no, it's like you have to be rich to be an actor, and I we we you have to...

...be rich or have money to play poor on television. So yeah, it with the way it works, as you know. They probably get training and they get acting coaches and seeing. I want those things, and she was like only who Amazin know, we have no money for that. And I was like, well, if I get the money, can I take an acting class somewhere? Can I get trained? She said to me, come, if you can get the money, you can do whatever you want, and I said okay, and it's six years old. I realized that no one's ever going to give you anything, you really have to go out and get it. And I was a lesson and most people would say, well, don't you feel round of a childhood, you know, because you had learned such a harsh lesson, lesson at such an early age? But Not really. I really kind of like push myself and I said, okay, I'm gonna do it. When you know, you know. And what's really inspiring about Harvey in particular is that time after time, he chose to do the thing that moved him towards his goal, even when it was hard or unpleasant. My friend told me about a hy and see a class that they were doing Improv and it was like twenty dollars or something for the sense and I asked him out for the money, of course, and she said no, and I said, okay, well, I need to get this class. I need to make money somehow. And then we were walking home from school and day and I saw this homeless guy going through trash cans and I said, what is he doing, mom? It's gross and you know, what is he picking up? And he's like, oh, those are the look what this? He sells the cans, and I said he can make money off the cans and bottles and she's like yeah, and I was like okay, and I ran her closet, got a wire hanger, unhooked it like an hinge the top, stretched it out and I started going through trash cans and collecting bottles, cans, everything, rain or shine, every weekend in Saneta after school. It took me two weeks to earn like six dollars and seventy five cents from the then I was like not even halfway there really, and it took me the rest of the month to raise the rest of the money and eventually I took the class and after it was an hour and a half of Improv that divided this this group into like six year olds to like nine and then ten to like teens, you know, and I was in small group obviously, but what we did was walk around and we're like you're a bear and you're lying now and now you're butterfly and we're like wow, and I remember after I was done, I just felt this crackle to the feeling of entertaining just because I made people laugh. I love making people...

...laugh. I can make people laugh every day. That's my goal. I just love it. That's that's really why I started doing as a kid, and I just remember I really love doing this, but do I want to spend another month going through trash? And I was sticky and gross and smelling, and it said yeah, I do, I really do, because what I felt for an hour and a half I am willing to sacrifice for a month of hard labor. Now, since you did all that, I mean, how did your mom react that? She had to have just been my this kid. Yeah, she you know the thing about immigrant parents, they're not here to take anything from anyone. They teach values to their kids. They hard work pays off, and what she was telling me that if you want something, we live literally in the country of opportunity, that you can do whatever you want. You know, you can be whoever you want if you go out and find a way. And at that age I just remember thinking I'm going to do this because I saw how hard my mom worked. She worked three jobs just to pay rent, you know, and just to put full on the table, and I saw what she was doing, like she was working hard to give us this opportunity and I was not going to waste the opportunity of being, you know, in this great country and I just remember I'm going to do and I kept doing it. I kept selling cans at think until I was eight and then I started selling chocolate store a door with this like total douchebag who took advantage of like low income communities. He would post, you know, little posters. It says, are you a team between the ages of you know, this agent is age and of course I lied. I said it was at least thirteen. I wasn't at that point and but I've always been big. So like he looked at me's like yeah, you look, look your team and I was like great, and let me sell chocolate store to door. He was just like total sleeves back he get, he would buy it for the night INS and store and you'd sell it for five dollars and he keep. Basically, you get dollar twenty five and keep the rest. So you sell a product for five dollars...

...because you're selling your face. You're like going door to door, knock, knock, knock, Hey, and you know Harvey, and I'm with blank, blank, blank and trying to sell my last box so I can go to six flags and the like. Oh they're so cute. Yeah, I'll buy box five dollars, right, but you only get dollar twenty five from each item, so you really have to sell like at least twenty five boxes a night to make any kind of you know, Bill, you know. And I would I became his best seller because it was all an acting game to me, like I literally go to door door and they would be like today I'm going to Disneyland, tomorrow I'm going I'm trying to go to camp, like the story would change whatever I needed to do, but because in the back of mind it was always you have to make the money to pay for those classes, for dance, for, you know, Ballet, for voice coaching, everything. So I just kept doing it. That teaches you a lot, right, because at that age, even as a high schooler, you realize that everything cost money, where everyone else has to get to eighteen and then sometimes they go to college and their parents still pay for everything. Then you're twenty five and you are like wait, the wrath of thousand dollars. Yeah, I kind of. Yeah, I got like a a crash course into like what you know, being an adult would be, and so it was really seemless to move out of my house and to move to different country. When I moved out of my parents place, was because I got a job in Japan and I moved to a different continent for thirteen months. And so I was living in Japan, you know, fresh out of school, and I just look back and it was it was hard, of course, because you move to different country. First of all, moving out is just hard in general. But I took a leap, like it was in like im moving down the street to my apartment with my friends mom. You know, it was like, I'm moving to Japan and I not going to be home for the holidays. I'm not, because you are working, and so I really have taken those steps that people do in life, but made them really dressed to just literally I moved and I did it and I came back. So everything seemed so easy after that, like it was like if I moved from one apartment to a house or whatever, it didn't seem like a big deal because I was like, I moved out of the country, you know, so at a young age. So I feel like I can pretty much tackle anything. Yeah, don't your mom, like, I'm...

...moving to a different time zone where it will be tomorrow. Yeah, when I get yeah, I needed to do it and those. One thing I said that I didn't come this far just to come this far. So when the opportunity, you know, is presented to me to do something great, even it is, you know, unfortunately, being away from your family and being away from your you know, partner or whatever, you have to remember all the things you did to lead up to this. You know, everything you've sacrificed till now. So why would you sacrifice all that in the past and then get to a certain place back you know what, am I gonna take that job in Japan, and I want to like be away from home, you know, and it's like, you look, sometimes they're sacrifices and you sacrifice so much to get here. Why Stop Now? Consistently making a choice to keep moving forward instead of giving up, take strength, dedication and courage. Even though we continue to progress as a society, there are still so many instances of discrimination, typecasting and stereotyping in Hollywood that are really hard to break away from. Can you talk a little bit about how, you know, coming to Hollywood, in particular, being queer and a person of color and all of these different things where Hollywood in the past? I mean, yes, it's getting more diverse and that's great. It's shifting. I won't point it was like if you're not this white muscular guy, you're not going to work. You know what I mean? Yeah, when I started, I remember I had people tell me that, you know, like I had agents who told me that when I first got, you know, into Hollywood, if you will. I got my first agent when I was in high school, my senior year, and I remember that they went down a list, literally they were in a list that are going to lose the weight, and it's like Oh, because you know, I've always been plus, as you know, and bigger and I've been Husky and whatever you want to call it. But I never saw it as a I have to change. You know, I didn't want to change because I feel comfortable and my body and I felt I wasn't. I didn't feel uncomfortable my body until someone told...

...me I should be. So the weird part is that it's other people's perception of who I should be that completely changes and shifts your mind about who you are, because I was comfortable growing up in my skin. It wasn't til someone pointed out that I shouldn't be. And it was until, you know, agents as well. Yeah, it's wait, you know you're not going to get leaning rope part and I was like why not? And that's like no one casts like a Chubby Gut to be the lead where. Now we have seen that and we have seen the the there's a market for you know that. There people are being seen as just human and in telling the story and not just the first things. He's like, oh no, they cannot be a love in triest. They are big and we cannot have that. I but I did go through that where used to go to auditions and the breakdown literally like these writers, which is literally put down that guy and they didn't bother to give him a name. Like it was like, and it wasn't even focusing necessarily on the their body size. It was just like, Oh, seen what the guy that had dialog. They didn't even bother to give the fat guy a name. There was just like fat Guy Number One and it's like you have several lines and you could have called him Ted, Chicada, whatever you want to call him. They didn't even give them the value of a name. And this firmer looking back at like my early auditions, where I had to go to the auditions that was an opportunity that I had and I was like, so, you go in the door, you smile, you do it and you book it and thing he get to setting. You're like, do we have to keep calling like it is, and then the Oh yeah, Le Let's just call him Ted, you know, let's call it so like the idea that even in the writer's room, the value they were putting people of size. What's don't even bother, it's I don't even bother game name. Just call him fatty. That's it. And it was just like it blew my mind that like where that has I would think that the writers would be more creative than that. You know your writer for a reason, that you spend your whole career learning how to be right a great writer, and you can't think of a name for a human being.

That's really been my mind when I first got started, and of course it's changed and it's going in a better direction, but we've come so far, but we got so far to go. What's unique about being a queer actor or other public figure is that you often have to come out multiple times, first personally and then again publicly. Real hear about Harvey's coming out experience. After the break I came out to my mom. I feel like in high school, was like sophomore year. She would always hint that my friend at the Diana, was really pretty and little dish know that at the end of is also queer, and she would I was like, stidyneat that end, like she's the pretty, isn't she just like yeah, she is, and she was like so she have a boyfriend? was like no, she doesn't. She should get a boyfriend and I was like, oh well, it's up to her, you know, because I'm not also talking about my friends, you know, personal relationships with my mom, and she said, well, you should date her, and I was like and it looked at her because I think there was an UN unspoken thing where I thought she knew and I thought was pretty obvious, and sometimes you really have to nail it on the head, you know what I mean. Like it was literally like wait, mom, I looked over and it's looked straight in the eye and I said, you know, I'm Kay right, and she goes Oh, Pussy Puss Phillis, which means I as long as you're happy. You know. It wasn't like a shot and I think she I think what she was doing was she needed to hear it, Ye know. So when she was throwing those little hints what she it was really more for her, like I didn't officially say it is until that moment, and then when she heard it, it was done like it was sad. And I think sometimes coming out is more for other people then the person themselves, you know, because I feel like I was so comfortable in like my friends knew, you know what...

I mean, like who I was, and I feel, like I said, I was comfortable my own skin, but like it was for other people's comfort to be like, okay, well, now that's covered from kick. Good. Now we know Harvey, like many Queer entertainers, has a different expectation of being at least somewhat public about his personal life, whether it's being featured on the out one hundred or cultivating a presence with other lgbtq magazines. Being vocal about your own journey as a queer person can have a profound and positive effect on young people in Conservative families and cities across the country. It's so funny. I feel like I'm just talking about this is someone I don't think I've had an official like come out party or, you know, or parade. I never been on out one hundred, which is surprising. People were just pointing this out yesterday online because out says, who should we cominy for a one hundred, and I thought about I was like, oh, that's right, I never been and I've been on this, this business for like ten years, ten years and done, you know, really cool stuff. Wont to Gladder Word, which, you know, that alone was like a big accomplishment and an honor. And to think I was like I never really had coming out like article or like a cover people magazine and what I mean, because it's if you know me, you know me, and if it helps someone and you know what they're coming out story in middle America, that I want them to know that I am I'm here, you know, but no one's ever really asked, you know, and I think credit this to the fact that would people ask I about was six to blond, blue eyed? Would that be more of a headliner? But since I'm, you know, person of color, I'm shorts out. It's not of a bigger news story. Unfortunately, and it's true, I feel like because of that, you know, because you see people like so and so comes out and it's like sexy cover with the whatever, you know, lun dray or something,...

...and it's like Whoa they are gay, you know, and it's usually like the sex appeal of coming out and for some reason no one seems to be bothering to know that there's people who are queer all around you who don't look like a good cutter. You know, that's unfortunate and I hope to change that. But it was funny because I can prove that no one's asked me and facetoface like Oh, by the way, they just by the time they figure it out that I oh, yeah, I knew, yeah I knew, or yeah, I heard her. So, but there was never like a big deal and when made a big Hurrah for me to do it, and so I'll make my own hurrah. You have to. Yeah, you know coming from because I once upon a time worked much closer without, but it was very much what you said. It's who's going to make bring the most eyeballs. And I'm even like, I don't know if you know quigsay Din and Neal Marin. They produce like the Oscars and all of those, but there was one year where they wanted to be on it and they've never been on it and they didn't end up being on it and they produce the Oscars that year. HMM. And when I talk to him he was like it's because I old, and you're like, I don't know, yeah, maybe, absolutely, and it's there's a certain image they goes. It's so weird because I would think with coming out it would be like a celebration of a life and a story, and then it's like, oh, they're coming out where they look like, you know, and it's like what we can we put a sexy snake in their crotch, you know, and it's like what wait, when it went were just just telling people that they are, you know, coming out and they're, you know, like when Ellen page came out, that was great too, but like, you know, I feel like it was needed. It was such a time where it was like there's kids who need to see representation in front of them, that they are killing themselves, you know, because they feel isolated. And you know, we were kind of a bubble in La New York, the major cities, but we forget the Middle America is not, you know, this bubble. And even the fear is now that I'm seeing it more in these bigger cities now, like I've literally seen stuff on the street where I'm like, where are we, like what? What time is this and what's happening?...

Because we unfortunately have, you know, an administration that feeling that and telling people that it's okay to attack what's different and to make someone a monster because you don't agree with their lifestyle or there or who they love or what they love, you know, and how they love. And that's unfortunate and we need to make a quick change and shift because it is spiraling. Yes, the entertainment industry is genuinely shifting in terms of diversity and the acceptance of Queer actors and performers, but there is still a long way to go. Like I seen earlier, every time I book like a major role or series regular on the show or movie, I feel like I want the lottery, because you really did, you know, out beat thousands and thousands and thousands of people for the role, you know. So, trying to think of the high, I guess the highest is always I'm always happiest when I'm working, when I'm on set. I have friends and family visit me on set and if I'm dating someone I loved ones there and it's a it's a family thing. When everything I love is tangible and within five feet is when it's my highest, when everything I love is around me and I'm surrounded by it. Love being on set and when people can visit me on set and doing what I love and they get to see the work I do and we get to have lunch, like that's that's the high, like that is my highest, like the it's you, for you know what I mean. It's like, yeah, it's the it's the highest. And then the lowest, I think, would be, you know, it's tough because you are you know, this world of acting is like there's you're in a high for a while and...

...then your might being low for a while, and so that roller coaster goes up and down. When it's like you're down to your last twenty bucks, you know, or something. I remember when I was like working at a theater company and I literally decide to take the leap I'm going to do and I get a series regular on the show and I was like this is great, and then the show we canceled, and then you're like who like what I do, because do you go back to, you know, a ninety five? Do you go back to that because it'll limit your audition times, or do you take the plunge and say Nope, I'm an actor, that's what I'm doing. I'll find, you know, ways to make income well with acting and I'll make it happen. But there's always that scary like, you know, it's like a tight rope. Yeah, it's just like you might fall any second, and it's that anxiety because you're like, okay, okay, Hey, I book this job. That's going to hold me, that's going to hold me, and you take three more steps in the tight rope and you're like, okay, we're good, we're good. Weregot we getting your balancing, balancing, and like who, okay, kind of the job. Okay, steady, steady. And then it might be dry for a couple of weeks, or maybe a couple months, in the winds blowing and you're like Oh, and you're still on the tight rope being like Oh, the winds blowing, the wind blowing, wooner, no, come on, come a con and it's starting to get foggy up. I don't even know where the rope is anymore. I'm be there. It is I can see the rope, I can see it, and then you book something and in the Sun comes out. So it's just that thing. That's how you can relate to be an actor, and it was in the tight rope and you just trying to get from one point to the other. To for you, getting from this point to this point is just because you love everything in between, even when it's folly. Yeah, it's even as foggy. Yeah, yes, the entertainment industry is genuinely shifting in terms of diversity and the acceptance of Queer actors and performers, but there is still a long way to go. It has changed, but it hasn't changed completely. That makes sense, I feel like. Yeah, like Theresa is cold and like anyone who knew him knew, you know, because I was his personal life and he's allowed to love for everyone, you know. But it what does it affect him? Because, you know, he's no longer sex object for a teenage...

...girl to put a post ro over her bed, you know, and boys, you know, like because at the end of the day it's numbers. You know who watches these shows? The demographic it's female, you know, and he's a leading man. He's handsome and unfortunate for us that that's the way that Hollywood has been doing it for so long that it's hard to break a habit, but they are breaking it, and you and we've proven that those fans will support the the actor, the talent behind this character because they love the person. People are so stuck in the idea that fans fall in love with the character and if the character themselves is being performed by a queer actor and that character is not queer and they're straight, that people fall out of the fantasy, that people completely drop and like I'm not watching that, that guy's gay and he's in a love story with the female. No, thank you. Know what I mean. Give people some credit that. As a performer and a Thesbian, that's what your job is, is to portray a life, and it's not your own, someone else's life, and in your life, if you're queer and you love someone, that's your life. Don't get the two confused. As a performer, I'm always blown away when people meet me and they go like, Oh, you're not, like yeah, you know, and it's like that's that's a character. You know, I play that and it's like, Oh, I know, but I thought you were like, you know, I was just expecting you to be like that and I almost disappointed sometimes is that you're not this character and it's like, but that's what you tuned in to watch that character, so you should tune in every week to watch that character. You might not want tune in to watch my personal life. That's okay, because I'm not welcoming you with cameras into my living room and my kitchen. I'm not doing a reality show, you know. I'm welcome you to see this character develop and if you like the character, then the job was done. Give more of the foljeans of I think so. They should be any minute now, master fingers cross.

So give me this scoop on what we do in the shadows. Oh Man, what we do in the shadows. We just finished season one. Such we have so much footage that you guys will never see because there's just so much, who's hours and hours of like Improv like these. The whole cast is really great. You know, most of the casts from the UK and we got Matt Burry, Natasha, we got KVEA Nova, like it's insane, like it's just like everyone's super talented. It's like clean hot. I was compared to playing hot potato and playing hot potato and no one drops it. Like, guess you could play hot potato for hours with these people and it's just as good, like it never gets boring. It's so cool. If you watch the season, you see the art for Gee at Mother Le Cruise. I could do spoilers. I can assuming because hopefully people watch, but if you haven't, we find out the guy, evermore, is the offspring van Helsy. So that's the natural of vampire killer, which is unfortune for Gee, I'm because he wants to be a vampire so bad. And I think you know we we did comic con this year and it was my first comic con ever. It was amazing. It was really cool. I was there earlier because I was doing the panel. The actual meeting greet for incomic con was on Saturday, but I was like Thursday and people were tweeting that they couldn't make it to comic con because comic has become really expensive. I never been a comic come because for that reason I couldn't afford to go to comic con when I was in high school and in college and all that because I need to pay frcton classes. So I thought about that and I thought there's people in the city who would love to meet US and they can't meet as because they're going to go to comic con. So EFFEX had a exhibit right but the Hilton next door the comic con. Then you can go for free, like you can just walk through the made the we built the house for what we do in the shadows so awesome, and people can go for free. And I literally said, if you're here tomorrow to pm or something, you can come say hi, like you don't have to like, you know, pay money, because even though we're there for comic con, people were saying they couldn't afford it, and I didn't feel comfortable with...

I I've been there here to mean when you wish you can go see someone that you admire, someone that you like or you really care for the performance, whatever, and you can because you can't afford it. It's money. And I said come and I thought maybe two people, three or show up, and there was a line like around like the whole house area and down like the entrance and stuff, and it blew my mind and just went proven half of those people couldn't afford to get the tickets and half of them already had tickets and they were going to see us the next day, but they wanted to come and say hi anyways. They're going to see us twice and they idea that they came and they showed up. I was like, see this exactly, because we wouldn't be where we were without the fans, and why wouldn't you want to meet your fans if you can? I was already there. The rest of the cast was showing up the next day, so it was just me like meeting them, and I think that everyone connects a yet because he is the only human and the show and we're algie almost. We've all been in a job where we think that we're going to be considered for the promotion and we're overlooked. We've been in a relationship where we think this relationship is, in my head, going certain way and it's heading towards marriage or something, and the other person like, oh no, we're just saying and it's like, Oh, we've all been there, we've all had a GI at more in our lives. So I feel like that's what people come to that. Oh, I feel so bad for you and I feel sick and it's like see you feel bad because he's the only one that you can relate to. He's human and we all have human emotions and highs and lows and, unfortunate for us, we cry, we we'd laugh, which is good, but like, I feel that that's the only reason why people really connect to him, is because they are rooting for him to it down to the core, as humans, we all root for each other. We really do want us to succeed. I do want to support you and whatever you do, because I know that you want the best for me and I want the best for you. I think that's just the human and all of us, you know. So that's why everyone, I think, really connects to him. It's clear that Harvey has carved out an impressive career for himself over the last ten years and there are more great things in his future. So right now have the series called the filthy. Go to the filth seriescom...

...and you can look at the whole first season and we have great cameos. We have Danny Frinzai Z, we have CASSIE SCURBOW, we have cleaning Bollinger, cory two. So don't like all my friends came and played with us and they were so generous and sweeten. It's a great story about two friends. We're both queer millennials in la who are trying to just go through life and like it's like every day scenarios and it's really sweet story and I think you guys will enjoy as he should take a look. and where can everyone connect with you? You can follow me on instagram and twitter. Same thing under at heartkey, and so at Charpei Geuill, and it's funny. Although Harvey's success in Hollywood is a bit of a rarity, it's important to remember that people like him have a significant effect on the world. Both Harvey and his characters serve as a reminder that if you believe in yourself, anything is possible. Pride is brought to you by Straha media. If you like the show, leave us a rating and a review on Apple Podcast, share us with your friends, subscribe and all that good stuff. You can find us all over your socials, instagram, facebook and twitter at pride and follow me everywhere at me by chambers. Pride is produced by me LEA by chambers, Maggie Bowls and Ryan Tillotson, edited by Sebastian. I'll call.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (151)