Everything's Gonna Be Okay With Adam Faison
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Episode · 2 years ago

Everything's Gonna Be Okay With Adam Faison

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Adam Faison is an actor with an undeniable ability to transform. He is queer, but has played primarily straight characters. He’s also played a variety of races and ages. Now, he’s on the new Freeform show Everything’s Gonna Be Okay.  Be sure to follow Adam on IG! Your host is Levi Chambers, co-founder of Gayety. Follow the show and keep up with the conversation @Pride. Want more great shows from Straw Hut Media? Check out or website at strawhutmedia.com. Your producers are Levi Chambers, Maggie Boles, Ryan Tillotson and Edited by Sebastian Alcala Have an interesting LGBTQ+ story to share? We might feature U! Email us at lgbtq@strawhutmedia.com. *This podcast is not affiliated with Pride Media. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

STRAWUT media. Adam Faison is an actor with an undeniable ability to transform. He is queer but has played primarily straight characters. He's also played a variety of races and ages. Now he's on the new free form show everything's going to be okay. Today we talked to Adam about growing up, coming out and fighting for authenticity in TV and film. I'M LEA by chambers and this his pride. Hi, my name is Adam Faison and I play Alex on everything's going to be okay. Adam grew up in poway, a small suburb of San Diego. He moved north to Study Theater and film in College and got a job in turning an NBC universal. And then I was like, you know, I really do want to act, but I I just was very nervous about it and my parents very practical. Based on advice from a friend, he decided to give it a year and see if he could get a career going. He started self submitting on La Casting and actors access and pretty soon he was booking parts and then kind of parlayed that into getting mercial representation. With the help of his new commercial representation, he booked a commercial that aired on CNN during the twousand and sixteen elections. An agent happened to see his commercial on TV and reached out. He asked Adam to come in so they could talk about theatrical representation for TV and film. So we sat down. The commercial literally ended up playing in the middle of the meeting, which was really hilarious because he had CNN coverage on the back and the background. I don't believe anyone telling me how I was to live in my life less. It's a way to pay off my student love dead. From there he booked his first big gig on the show liberty crossing, and after that the jobs kept coming. He was on agents of shield in two thousand and...

...eighteen, here and now into the dark, and now everything's going to be okay, where he plays a queer character for the first time. So let's talk about coming out. Adam says the first person he opened up to about his sexuality was his childhood best friend, Julianna. Juliana's brother was one of the few people in town that had come out as queer. I felt safe like telling her because she sort of loved me unconditionally. I guess I didn't really know what it's explicitly say at the time, but she was really just would goof off together and she always was just a really good friend of mine. After coming out to Juliana, Adam decided to wait before coming out to anyone else. He was getting bullied at school and didn't want to invite more trouble. Yeah, I remember going to school like in sixth grade and a kid was like called me a flamer and I didn't even know what that was because it were like clogs to school, which was, I mean, in retrospect, was pretty bad idea, but a fashion for pop you know what I say. We're clogs. If you want to wear clogs, you do you six grade Adam. A few years later in high school, Adam came out to another friend. That friend told her twin sister. I'm not going to say that evil twin, but that other twin told everyone. So I was kind of like a publicly outed in sorts, but it was this thing where it was like no one would explicitly say it. They just like would like I'd hear them talking about it or something like sort of behind my back, which is almost like even more like awkward or embarrassing. His mom told his brother that she had always known. Then Adam called his dad on the phone and came out and he just was like, you know, I always kind of thought that you just had a lot of girls that were friends, and I was like, well, I do that. Yeah, he's like, but I thought maybe, like you know, that one of them was your girlfriend, and I was like well, you know, no, they're all just friends. I think dad's they want not gonna like generalize all dad's, but a lot of dads think like Oh, he is a player. Look at all these girls and like he's willing to play my little pony to get close to them, like US unds uplay. Yeah, that's not so...

...much right. Yeah, but so funny, I know. And the DAD's just trying to you know, it's kind of it's hard, as I had an know Howord of society. I think like you know, it's like, you know, straight until proven gay. Yeah, yeah, so the whole time he's like, but you might not be. Yeah, yeah, yeah, it was like, you know, he just yeah, he just kind of held onto that and then I think as time went on to I like had other girls that, it were, was really close with, and he even sort of question whether, like maybe I had something with them. And I mean I think everything's a spectrum. Like I still feel like I have like I think I want fully gay and now sometimes I feel like some terms of like, you know, I like I'm definitely in a an exploratory phase and life. So, you know, I think it's really cool that society is definitely open to more of a spectrum now for guys and girls, yeah, and everybody in between, right, and it's kind of cool to be able to float on that spectrum and not like yeah, yeah, not like cross anyone on exactly. Yeah, totally playing Alex, a gay character on everything's going to be okay, also helped his dad understand and accept him. We were at Adfest, which add to some festival and Anaheim, and I saw him up sort of in the audience, like towards the back with his girlfriend and then at the beginning of the screening and then at the end I looked up and they were gone and I was like, Oh crap, I was I just imagined. I thought I could be honest, I thought he I just thought he was like literally was offended and then left and then I like looked down and then I saw that he had moved closer to be closer the QA, which is like really sweet and like, I don't know, and then he stood up and then he basically was just like, you know, I to be honest, I'm a military man. I'm, you know, a straight may little harryman that grew up in Staten Island and you know,...

I don't know why I related to the show or while I likes to show, but I think it was a human connection and I think, like you know, I normally probably wouldn't watch the show because it feels a little out of the box for me. But you know, I liked it and he's like it's I just really like these characters and they were weird but fun and in a weird way, I kind of felt like he was like this was his like way of saying, you know, like I'm proud of you or I'm proud of what you're doing with the show. Did he stand up and ask if he did? He did. He stood up and he was like, he was like that asn't that's my son. He didn't know it was funny because I'm cute, but I feel like it was kind of like because he's like yeah, he was like he knew that I like knew who if like he knows I know that he like that he loves me, but like this was kind of like I just want to say as a person, like you know, and I think it meant a lot more, I think, to the audience too, to be like an especially the executives that were there that were like wow, like you know, we never we kind of don't really aim for like huge broad audiences were really niche and it was really cool for them to hear that somebody could connect to it. And like, because I'd also might dad to be honest, like he wouldn't sugarcoat things or, like I was saying, you wouldn't sugarcoat them and like make it a thing where you know he'd lie at all just because he's my se I'm his son, you know, like so in a way he is indicative, I think, of like any person that would just be there. On the other hand, coming out professionally was a little anticlimactic. He didn't intentionally come out, but a simple instagram post without a long explanatory personal essay did it for him. I just wrote, and I think it's just written on like a photo like feeling queer today but made delete later as a joke. And then I was promoting the show into the dark and then in an article they were like openly gay actor and I was like what? I was like, I...

...didn't I. Yeah, I guess I don't explicitly say, but I guess it feels like. I kind of feel like it was. It wasn't even really like a full conversation or anything. I mean, I guess you know I'm talking about it more and more. The real conversation, Adam says, was with his management. Like a lot of actors, he was afraid that being openly gay would get him type cast, but his management was supportive and then I think they were encourage me. They're like, well, we have such a plethora of roles that we've been submitting you for and that you've done up to this point. I mean it hadn't played gay apart from a single episode on the fosters. Adam hadn't played a queer character until last year when he booked. Everything's going to be okay. Jennefy hates you. What. You are terrible at love, while you're so bad at this. I mean, I can't keep dating him. How I you don't think I should be in love with Alex. he is very gay. Now that's our requirement. Everything's gonna be okay. New Episode Thursday at Thirty on free form. You know, for me it was like, okay, this actually all this as aligned, because this role is very threedimensional, like Alex of very threedimensional characters, especially because he's written by a queer person himself. While the characters on everything's going to be okay have defining characteristics like being queer or autistic, it's only one aspect of their storyline. These are just humans living life and I think that's that's true to form. You know, that's that's how life is is, you know, we are people that just so happen to have identities, but in then the day, we're just humans. When we come back, diversity and TV and film and casting authentically welcome back. Before the break, we were talking with Adam about his experience coming out and his first time playing a queer character on TV. Besides playing both straight and queer characters,...

Adam has also experienced an odd flexibility when it comes to race, and it was this weird but it was this weird thing to wear it because I look a little bit ethnically ambiguous. It was kind of throwing the Spaghetti on the wall and seeing with sticks. I remember I had an agent being like you're like the Hindes, fifty seven sauce, like you could play anything. Adam is half black, half white and he speaks Spanish. As a result, he says he gets called to audition for a lot of Latin x roles, but just because he can pass for a Latin x character doesn't mean he wants to play one. Because it happens so often, he developed a sort of litmus test to decide whether or not he'll audition for a role that doesn't align with his own racial identity. If the role just so happens to be this race, then and it doesn't dictate the storyline or the character's narrative and it's not intrinsically tied into it, then I will go in for it. But if it's tied to the storyline, like say there was one role and they were client for like a Mystizeo, like sort of a person from indigenous heritage who was Latin X, I was like, and that was a huge part of the storyline that they speak. I think it was no wattle, which is like a dialect. I was like, I speak Spanish, but that's such a specific like that's such a specific dialect and such specific positionality that, like, especially if that's one of the first roles, I would feel very guilty just morally knowing that. It's like, you know, somebody who isn't from that experience in coop could have an opportunity like that. You know, to take that away would be really just feels morally corrupt and actually, funny enough, I rer into the guy at a party like three or four months later that books that role and I was we were talking and he was like, Oh, he doing that movie or who's like what are you working on? And I was telling him and I was like what about you? And he was like, Oh, I just I did this movie with Helen Hunt where I'm playing like a like an indigenous, like an an a watal guy, and he's trying to get across the border. I was like, you're...

...kidding me, and I was so freaking happy for him because he's like yeah, I'm like, basically, like my parents are from Mexico and from that area of Mexico. So it was so it was just awesome to like see him light up and have that sort of connection with the experience, you know, and that's I think one of the exciting things about like authentic casting now that's been happening with the advent of this diverse casting, is, you know, seeing that like connection and I think other kids probably seeing that connection as a result and seeing themselves reflected through him in the role acting. Wise. Yeah, who do you feel like is just kicking ass in the space? WHO's queer? Oh Man, they're not to be super famous. Yes, I I got not lean a way. It's like really inspired to me, like I just I don't know, watching I don't know if you saw that things giving day episode of Master of none, and I think she kind of more fell into acting because she was a writer, but I'm just super inspired by her and I think that it's just like just in terms of her career, it's something like that I really like want to model my career after. She's just such a like it's just such a like honesty and a depth to her that I really love. And Yeah, just in general what she's kind of used her platform for, you know, highlighting other voice as I think is really inspired to me. There's a lot more diversity in Hollywood right now. Not only has Amazon and Netflix given opportunities to people not normally represented in mainstream TV and movies, one of the big studios leading the charges, kind of surprisingly, Disney, I think, particularly free form as an entity of Disney is doing a really, really great job about championing for diversity, especially...

...in the lgbtq community. Now, Disney has not always been a champion of diversity, but in recent years they've really stepped it up. Still, bringing more diversity into the mainstream doesn't stop it writing the characters. Creators also need to give those roles to actors that reflect those identities. Over the years, SIS gender people have been cast in trans roles a lot. Jared Letto won an Oscar for playing a Trans Character Rayon in the two thousand and Thirteen Film Dallas Buyers Club, and some people liked it, but a lot of people didn't. To them it was even more offensive than his portrayal of the joker, which was just awful anyway. Amazon primes transparent did both Jill Soloway cast Jeffrey Tambor and the lead role as Moira, and they cast transactress trace lasette and a supporting role. Watching Trace Lazette and that episode where she's walking through the water like the in bandoned water park and she's just like there's this really explosive scene between she and one of the two class brothers and it's like you can just feel the experience, like the lived experience, in her. And I mean that's not to say that assist gender person couldn't bring that, because we all have our own baggage that we bring to something to the character, but I think there was something just intrinsically connected to to that experience for her and Adams opinion, straight people playing queer roles is a little different, but I mean hey, like terms of queer roles, like Timothy Shallow may gave an amazing performance in call me by your name, and there are amazing performances by straight actors playing queer characters. So I mean the end of the day, sometimes it's just whoever's the best fit for the role but tends to be authentically the best people are the people who have lived through similar experiences themselves. For Adam, he enjoys having the ability to play both queer and straight characters...

...as actors. I think we can have the diversity to play both. Like I think I don't know, I'm kind of inspired by Neo Patrick Harris, because I think he was able to sort of defy what norms are like in society, being like this is a certain type of gay person or this is whatever. Like I think he was able. I mean Barneystons or whatever his character's name was, was like, you know, a huge womanized. It was like fascinating and now he kind of can break through and play other queer characters. But I mean as an actor, just naturally I like to explore different types of characters. Do you have any characters that you can think of that are either reoccurring on a television show or in film who you feel should explore their sexuality because of how much it would bring to representation? I'm trying to think. I like, I don't know. I for some reason, I like I keep having Henry Caville like in my head and it would be cool to see like a gay superman or something, or like Morech superheroes. Oh my yeah, I'm like, Damn, he just is like just a man. Did he's just a man, so Ito'ld be like really kind of interesting to see him like explore sexuality within a roll. I don't know, I just, yeah, be down to see that because, like everyone would. Yeah, exactly when you know you're going to have a scene come out where you're making out or things like that, differ, just sit there and watch them with your mom. You like, let's watch this episode. You want to know it's buddy is. She came what set for like episode eight with my older brother and it was sexy time scene and like the whole episode is literally like sexy see like US rolling around in bed and like making out and stuff, and I the whole time I can think about with them in the video billage like watching and I was like, Oh God. So I like literally had to I had to do some mental gymnastics to try to figure...

...out how to just forget about them, and eventually I just wants the scene kind of ramps up, you kind of just end up connecting with the person and everything kind of disappears and it's just you two together. But yeah, I like it's just such a weird feeling to see her like watching me watch sexy time or like, I don't know, or like watch these things, but luckily I tend to not. I don't watch any of it. Really did with the her so that's kind of good, but also it's like wholesome, like, you know, for it farm. This is not like Disney, although there is a bottoming scene in the second episode. So yeah, for all, she wasn't on ste for that one. He was not outset for that. I remember I had to go into a tr and he was like can you just make like moaning noises? He's like, I just won't like to hear like moaning noises. He has like a very weird x and he like talks like this and he's like, I just want to hear like moaning. For more from Adam, you can follow him on instagram. His handle, it's his name Adam face on. That's a Damfaiso and and you should definitely watch him on his new show. Everything's going to be okay has premiered, which bring your January sixteen on free form and Hulu the next day. So every week it's on Thursdays at a thirty and then it drops on Hulu the next day. So you guys can check them out if you want to see him bottom or yes or top, who know? They're to tuning. Pride is a production of Straw hut media. If you like the show,...

...leave us a rating and a review on Apple, podcast, spotify or wherever you're tuning in from. Share us with your friends, subscribe and follow us on Instagram, facebook and twitter at pride. You can follow me at me by chambers. Pride is produced by me Le by Chambers, Maggie Bowls and Ryan Tillotson, edited by Sebastian Alcohol. Give us fifteen seconds of moaning and go okay, that's good, that's good and seeing.

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