Drag Saved My Life w/ Kevin Aviance
PRIDE
PRIDE

Episode 149 · 2 weeks ago

Drag Saved My Life w/ Kevin Aviance

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

When Beyoncé released her newest album, Renaissance, a few months ago, she paid homage to a culture that shaped who she became as a performer. In her liner notes she said: “Thank you to all of the pioneers who originate culture, to all of the fallen angels whose contributions have gone unrecognized for far too long. This is a celebration for you.”

Today, we talk to one of those pioneers, Kevin Aviance. We learn how a young boy in Richmond, Virginia went from singing Aretha Franklin in his sister's dress to being inducted into the famed House of Aviance in Washington DC, and later sampled on the biggest album of 2022. We talk about the different schools of drag and how the scene has changed over the last 30 years. Does the mainstreaming of drag make the world a safer place? 

Plus, hear the song that Beyoncé lifted up and celebrated on her track Pure/Honey. 

Follow Kevin Aviance on instagram: @kevinavianceofficial

Your host is Levi Chambers, founder of Rainbo Media Co. You can follow Levi @levichambers across socials.

Follow the show and keep up with the conversation @PRIDE across socials.

PRIDE is produced by Levi Chambers, Maggie Boles, Ryan Tillotson, and Brandon Marlo. Edited by Maggie Boles and Daniel Ferrera.

Do you have a queer story to share? Email us at pride@strawhutmedia.com

*This podcast is not affiliated with Pride Media.

Straw media. You know, I don't know exactly what made me what I like just live and just keep going. And I think it is because of drag. You know. I think drag literally saved my life, you know, because I tried to denounce it and try not to take try not to do it anymore. You can't kill something that's inside of you. That's all you know how to do. You know, people may be able to stop you, but you can't. You gotta live your life. You gotta do what you have to do, you know what I mean. Imagine for a second that you're sitting at home. You get a strange text from a friend. She says, the most famous singer in the country, maybe even the entire world, has listed your name on a track on her brand new, highly anticipated album. You shrug it off. It's probably a joke, but you listen to the album and you hear your voice. It's an homage. Your phone starts buzzing. Everyone is calling you. That's what happened recently to performance artists and club personality Kevin Aviance. And no, we're not talking about Taylor Swift, who disappointed Gaylor believers everywhere by not coming out on her recent album, we're talking about Beyonce Giselle Noels Carter. Beyonce has long been an ally to the lgbt Q plus community, with her voice getting louder and louder over the last ten years. She's been outspoken in supporting trans kids and marriage equality, and now she's dedicated her newest album, Renaissance, in part to her uncle Johnny, who died of AIDS related illness when she was seventeen. The album pays homage to him and a culture that shaped who she became as a performer. In her liner notes, she says he was my godmother and the first person to expose me to a lot of music and culture that serves inspiration to this album. She goes on to say thank you to all of the pioneers who originate culture, to all of the fallen angels whose contributions have gone unrecognized for far too long. This is a celebration for you. So today we'll talk to one of those pioneers. We'll learn how a young boy from a big family in Richmond, Virginia went from singing a wreatha Franklin and...

...his sister's dress to being inducted into the famed House of Auviance in Washington, d C. We'll talk about the different schools of drag and how the scene has changed over the last thirty years. Does the mainstreaming of drag make the world a safer place? And of course we'll talk about Beyonce's new album Renaissance and how that album's release was perfectly timed with the rebirth of Kevin Aviance. I'm Kevin Aviance and this is Pride. I am so excited to have you on the podcast. I've been listening to your music all morning. Tell me who you are. I am a black queen from which Virginia that had a dream. Kevin was just a kid when he had his first moment in the spotlight. Yes I was. I was in fifth grade and telecotes at this dilementary school and I sing, I was about my sisters, us and my just just scarf the word on my head, and my mom came into my makeup. She didn't know what was doing this, but she she supported me, and she did my face. And I was supposed to tell my father, no one was to know, and and she said, if you don't win, you know, that's okay. You know you don't win. You don't win. But you know, I said, mom, I got it, and I saying I will survive, and they started the first I was afraid. I was petrified. My boy was a lot higher back then. And then I walked out, you know, and they couldn't believe it. They were, you know, shocked. But once you're in it, you're in it, you know. And I did the show and performed saying the thing, saying it live, and won the competition at the elementary school. So would you consider that your first professional performance? I guess, yeah, you have to start somewhere, you know, do you do you remember how you felt after you sang those first few notes and you walked out on stage, you performed, you know, I'm I grew up in the church,...

...so performing was just fine, you know what I mean. I could perform, I could decks thing I loved. I loved an audience, and I loved I loved makeup, so I loved you know, being So the character was really really great. I loved it, you know, I was I'm a bit Michael Jackson, Darren rossbreak, you know what I mean. So Prince saw that, so painting and all that stuff was just like, you know, that was the first time, so I loved doing all that. So would you say that the all of those aspects kind of influenced and helped you, I guess, get into the vogue, the ballroom scene, the nightclub scene of New York City. Could you talk a little bit about how all of that started. I started in d C. Actually, so when when moving to d C, I met a bunch of kids there and they used to have a night on Sunday nights at this place called Tracks Nightclub. Tracks Nightclub was a um was where I really started. I started being a club kid there. And on Sunday nights though was the more it was the black night, black gay night, and um, A lot of people may not understand that, but that's how black gay people got along. You know, we went to our black gay clubs and had a good time. Or the night they would you specifically was for the black ay kids, you know, and it would be packed and we talk about two or three four thousand people there every Sunday, and you know, it's just like seeing these kids like doing runway and but that wasn't really up to part yet. But that's where I kind of learned all that stuff from UM. The music was intense, intense, intense, intense, and my love for house music and repetition and all that stuff. So moving from there to Miami then to New York, so I kind of like take my stuff with me. So I became the House of Abbas member in d C. And I met my my mother and we have to be part of the group, and I said yes. I actually we had a home then, and we moved into the home with them, and it was fabulous, It was incredible. It was a great experience. As for the ballroom, we started walking, I was immediately chopped and I wasn't that chopped me. I was just like, oh, no, you know, and it wasn't good, you know, it wasn't good at all. So I went and went to my amy and got my drag...

...education there with Kiddy Miao and Thedora and Power Infinity and by the Kibble and all these are the kids UM and learn from them the art of drag. Most of us know what we know about drag through popular culture. RuPaul's Drag Race pose on effects legendary on HBO Max, but even those shows don't always capture the nuance that exists within it. When my drag is a little bit different. I mean I am a big fan of Grace Jones, as you can see in Boy George and and um, the more avant garde type people that the um you know, the f A D lab which is like the goth label that was aufter the time, and Cocteau Twins and Susie and the Bansheese and all that stuff. So and plus on top of it being you know black. So for me, but um, drag is a real political it's a political stance for me. It's political and fashion thing for me. So uh and so with warm and that, I think that's where it all comes out. And you know, I don't wear I don't where wigs, don't you know, talk, I don't do any of that stuff. So you know, I just put the put the garments, so to make sure the faces beaten, go out there and do what I have to do. I love heels. I love heels. I love heels. Heels are my finish. I've had my hips replaced because of it, so then you must really love them if you're like it's worth it. I am obsessed with heels. Obsessed. Do you think that drags rise to mainstream success has made the world a safer place for gender nonconforming people or drag queens or trans people. Um I I you know, I love the way the world is today, but you have to understand something. There are people like being and and other people that are living their true lives that we're still living their lives in. You know, they did not have or living in the world that are didn't have the words that go with it. Okay, you know I now that...

...we have all these words, was still as fierce as it is today. You know what I mean? It was it was there was nothing else they didn't know how to do. I was traveling around the world, I was performing with like five thou people at the club. I was you know, I was that that girl, you know what I mean. So it was just as incredible as it is now. But the only thing about now it's, um, they're younger, they're they're they're these girls are great, They're all great, they're wonderful. Um they become you know, they got that main mainstream platform to be able to work there all their stuff out on it. Would you consider this an evolution then of drag and and what are those big changes that you've seen to drag as an art I mean Dragon. I mean, it's just like they are. It's not a drag. We doesn't do anything. I mean the dragons are everywhere. They're at the local pubs, they're at the you know, they're in the department stores doing makeup drags everywhere. So you know that before it was like just like me and some other girls that would get got accepted, and you know, it was interesting, you know what I mean, back in the days. But um, it's just a little bit different now. You know. Um, there's a time in your life where you are older and your life become a legendary and iconic or whatever, and those things are great. The only thing about that it becomes a curse after a while. So you just like, you know, when you're someone who does dragon, me that that you have to really find us really space in your head to like really you know, treat it as an art form, you know what I mean, and really like to carry yourself and stuff like that. You know, because you're not You're not twenty two anymore, you know what I mean. I'm not I'm not you know, Kevin, when I was twenty you know, So it's a little bit different. So um, I just love it, you know, I love it. Is there anything like anything in particular that you miss about the scene in the nineties and in early two thousand's. I miss the you could go out every night. I miss the the the the the plethora of what you could do in that one night, and like the list of things you...

...could do and the way you could. I missed that part of it. I missed the music. The music was untold, like it was like you go tell you hear this. You go downtown, every bar had fierce, fierce, fierst music going on. So I missed the music being more like, um, a different time. You can hear trip hop, you hear a house, you can hear all different types of music. I missed that. The music was amazing back the amazing because you already something new. There's always a new record coming out. There's always a new something coming out. I'm into the househead I loved. I love my underground music. I love the music that comes from our culture, that comes from our people. I love the music that is played for our people, you know, gay people, and the the the the artistry of that. It's amazing, you know. I love that We're going to take a quick break. When we come back, Kevin shares his story about surviving a brutal hate crime, how he healed and became an advocate for protecting the lgbt Q plus community. If you're not in a safe place emotionally to year about an act of violence and it's aftermath, that's okay. You can skip ahead to part three to hear about the song that earned its place on Beyonce's new album and the new music that Kevin Aviance is working on. Now, welcome back today. We're talking to performance artist and club personality Kevin Aviance, whose hit single County found new life on Beyonce's recent album Renaissance. But between those club days of the nineties where Kevin reigned supreme and his recent rebirth, there was a lot of pain. Just a heads up, this story is hard to hear, but it's important. Could you talk a little bit about what happened in two thousand sex and how it affected you? Um? Okay, so it was six I was Gay Pride season is giving a start. I'm doing a photoshoot for HX magazine. At times to gay rag that we had here. Um, actually the...

...major gay rag and I was leaving the photo shooting, just having some some sushi with some friends and then walking home. I was, you know, you know, hmman lang boots my bag, you know, shoes and bag. You know, um my new new cell photo. Just got past. Saw these guys talking to this white girl that's like these these things four guys for black guys talking to um, it's white girl. And they were like showing off for or something. They had just been tagging, and they they had you know, they speak the spray cans with them, and so I'm walking past them and one of them days, uh, you're not Diesel Sun, and I'm like whatever, I just kept going. Something told me he turned around, and I turned around. As I turned around, one of the speaks one of the cads went flying by my head, and then another can went by my head, and then a bag of trash went by my head. I was like, oh, forget about it, that's it. You missed three time, that's it. Let's move on, you know that, and said no, we're gonna get you baggett and they dispersed. One of them came towards me and I could feel the heat from his face, you know, the the anger the mad he was. I've never really felt that before from somebody, and it was really kind of like this is not going to be cute, Like I told myself right then and there. That was just like this is not good. And I knew it wasn't good. So I stepped off the curb to go into the street. And I'm still walking backwards, so I'm almost by the Beth Israel Hospital, so the first avenue and um I stepped off the curb to go into the street, and that's when the guys, the other three three guys were behind me, and I didn't know that, and they started punching me in my back and my p d A and my phone everything with the bag. Anyone to lose my bag, I just got it. So I just put my arm in my computer was in there, and I just kept wrapping my arm and into the hole literally like this, I want to lose that bag. And they just...

...started hitting me. And as I'm going down, they're kicking me in the head with those Air Force one sneakers, and I was like run the whole time I counted. I was like I counted like up to eighties. Sometimes you hit me in the head and I passed out. I woke up to somebody gotta get out of the street. You gotta get out of the street. You gotta get out the street. The cars are gonna hit you gotta get up. You couldn't get you couldn't pick me up. And so um, I wake up. And then as I jump up, I'm like like trying to talk in my jaws is it's like he's not working. And as I'm holding it like this and I'm just trying to you know, they said, dude, you gotta get to the hospital. Your head's blowing up. Your heads like swelling up. The hospital. So I walked to Beth Israel, which is right there, walked in. They didn't take me right away because I didn't have insurance. And and then finally these two ladies came back from the back. Two black ladies came like they were older, and they were like pink suits on, and they came and said, come on to go with us. And I was just like it's prying, going through it whatever, and they were like, be quiet, be quiet, be quiet, we got you. Everything's fine. And they said you gotta be okay. They're here to help you. Don't worry. Everything'll be fine, and then he just do and they left. So I'm sitting there and then I went into surgery and all that stuff afterwards. Those ladies actually didn't work there anymore. They never worked there, and people think I'm there. I was kind of crazy. These two black these these two ladies. I remember what they looked like everything to this day. I know the act with this and I they had short hair and everything, and I just, you know, my mom had just passed, so I don't know, it was just kind of her best friend. I passed right before that. So I really think that that time, it was just kind of like really weird. It was just really strange time because I can't really explain who these women were, and they did and worked there, and you know, the lot of stuff that...

...was going on. It's a lot of stuff that's going on. It's really kind of crazy. So yeah, I don't know, I get really BOSTI talking about it. It's like like it was yesterday. You know. Well, that's I mean, insanely traumatic and horrific. The two ladies that you mentioned. It's interesting you say they don't work there and then you remember what they were dressed in, because it's almost like they were just there to help you. Yeah, yeah, they because I could. I could because I couldn't get it. I couldn't get they wouldn't let me that. They were like there was trouble, but they didn't have insurance. So I was so much pain and they just women just grabbed me and put me in the back, you know what I mean. It was incredible. So you know, after you had surgery and you were then recovering what happened, then my mouthled wired ship for three months. Um, I had to actually have a redone again. Um, I went, I did gay Pride, I wrote up a float and I sat on it and sat on his elephant. You know. After I had to get to be done it because I said, shift the wires and stuff. So um um, it was a long long time after that. I mean basically like eight years until I got myself together again. I mean I was pretty much of a mess. Um all the PTSD and and the that was something I didn't know that anything about. I didn't know about the the all the all the syndromes and all the dramas that you get from it. And now I understand when someone gets attacked. I understand now what they go through. You You have no idea what a person goes through after an attack. It's just incredible. It's because you getting help, But you have to go through these things to the body. The body is resilient if you allow it to, if you allow yourself to do the work and and and take care of yourself afterwards, you can get better. But if you don't, and you and you go the bad way, because there's as you tried to yourself medicate, you try to you know, listen to everybody else, everybody lease you. And then I became a spokesperson for hate crimes after that, and I what I should have done was go and like take care of myself, but I didn't. I immediately, you know,...

I was working for the Human Rights Campaign and started doing campaigns and and talking for people, and it's just you know, when I wasn't take care of myself and it got really bad, really bad. I mean end up didn't and rehab afterwards, because it's just self bedicatie and trying to get myself together and just it just didn't work, you know. I just I was failing. I was failing really bad, you know, and I didn't care, you know, I just I was done. I did the best I could, you know, think it was I was talking like that, you know, I lived at least I lived the life, legendary life, and you know, whatever happens, what's like, what's going to happen, you know, and and basically not giving up, but just kind of like let the let it fall where it may. You have to understand something. After a hate crime, there were two other hate crimes after mine. Both of those guys died and they were killed, and so that really resonated in my head. How I was. You know, it's it's amazing. I'm here in front of you right now, it really is. You know. I don't know exactly what made me want to like just live and just keep going. And I think it is because of drag. You know. I think drag literally saved my life, you know, because I tried to denounce it and try not to take try not to do it anymore. You can't kill something that's inside of you. That's all you know how to do. You know, people may may be able to stop you, but you can't. You gotta live your life. You gotta do what you have to do, you know what I mean. We're going to take another quick break, but when we come back, the rebirth of Kevin Aviance and the power of Beyonce. Feeling Team, Feeling a feeling, feeling, feeling Tea t T T T T T T Tea Tea Tea Blave tea five Tea by Tea by A Tea...

Tea, Quo Tea Tea by Tea, Tea Tea by Tea, Tea teaete. That is County, the hit single by Kevin Aviance that made its way through the club scene twenty years ago and just experienced its own rebirth on Beyonce's new album Renaissance. The original version was created with producer Jarrell Black, who had written and produced the music and was looking for a new vocalist to work with. I went to the pier and Pierre was at a place where our Sundays you can see a lot of the kids anytime actually appear. You see a lot of the gay kids hanging out, bogey and carrying on. Um, so I see these saw these two younger kids were playing with a broken mirror and they're a girl. I'm County, I'm County, I'm County. So I just I just shotted that down and um, never heard the word before. So when I met Darrell drew Up, that is how his apartment, Um, he played this track for me. We had some food and he played this track for me, Dad Dad. I was like, oh, girl, that truck is hot, like he said, yeah, do you like it? I said, oh, so county, you know, and he goes, well, that's what we're gonna call a song now. He tells me to this day that he also one of the song a country song, so he had the word in his head too, which is really kind of funny too. And then I just started saying the lyrics of feeling like a really feeling like I feel like a days either like a literally feeling like a road, feel like an arch chid because saying the word over so orchid was like, that's where it came from. Really like a feeling like a really really like a wrong feeling like an OWD. And back then I was going, he she them, I them, they, I was saying all that stuff beforehand, you know, she them day she she saying.

I was just pointing at people, are she and he and just including everybody you know, And it's just funny how that's why I know my life is not a mistake. I know that my purpose is a little bit bigger than what I think some people might think it is. You know, the things that I was doing back then, I had no idea I was doing a girl, you know, I had no idea I was going to be doing doing all this stuff. And then the way the world is today, I just I don't know. I'm not saying that I'm like a philosopher or Socrates. They aren't there bullshit like that. I'm just saying that, you know, when you step into your shoes and you just go and do yourself, and you have ups and downs, ups and downs everywhere you have, you know, good days, badges, whatever. But if you're true to yourself and you do things, sooner or later you get in line with the universe. You know what I mean, Sooner or later you do. And I love being young and all that stuff. But I'm having the best time right now, a fifty four and it's amazing. It's amazing. Well, and I mean, something massive happened this year with that song when Beyonce sampled country for her new album. How did you first hear that she did? And what was your impression? My friend um Anita abbiance is. One of my sisters sent me a little text and the text was listing, and I was like, what is this? He goes, girl, that's Beyonce. This album's checklisting you you're You're on the album? I said, girl, shut the fuck. I'm like, there's no way in hell girl, Like I just I dismissed it right away, like what are you talking about? Girl? Like come on, like no. So I went to sleep. So the album's dropping that night. I missed the twelve o'clock so I gotta be like three, and I started listening to the album and I gagging. The albums gagging me. I'm like, oh my god, like she is carrying like a huge Beyonce here. I live for Beyonce, like I live for...

...this woman. I see my queen. I live live live. And I don't know think I'm part of the bee Hive because I don't really I'm not. I'm not going after people, but with obsession about Beyonce, I live for her anyway. Then it got down to pure honey, it's pure slash honey. I couldn't believe it. Baby rushed to my head real fast, and I was just like, I just think there was people were here and I was just like, what's going on it? I can't put me this, what is going on? I can going what is going on? What is going on? And it's my voice, It's I know country, I know my voice. It's my voice. And then it's on there like three times, like three separate times. It is like and then I hear my girlfriend mair Rene at the end of it, and I'm like, oh my god. She would have loved this moment if she was alive, she would be like, darling, you would beginning at me. I can hear her right now, you know what I mean. It was amazing and she did it perfectly. She did it properly. She gave so much respect. It just woke me up to a lot of top you know what I mean. And we're all connected and that's the universe. That's like you get ready to be your next part of your life and its just like get on the ride and do it. I mean you you have your art in this very full circle way that you just described, like drag and voguing in ballroom. It's all made it into mainstream pop culture, like you are mainstream pop culture. Something that you created for queer culture that was part of queer culture twenty years ago is now part of probably the biggest album of the year essentially, so beyond drag Race in the ballroom competitions and voguing dance classes. What do you think the net effect is of all of this queer culture kind of meshing with mainstream culture. Is it a positive thing? It's so funny because about about...

...a year ago things were changing in a way. Like I always say, you know, you don't know if you heard this for the phrase of black boy Joy, but but there was this whole thing of these black queens, black gay people, black gay men that would keep keeping pressed and you know, gooding forward. And I was like, wow, this a black boy Joy quitt and hitting the you know, the main street was really great. This is also a big, a big time for for these black gay men that were happening. You know, no longer did I have to use Hollywood from the Mannequin movie. That was like the only thing that was like out there that was represented black ay men or black a men in like Medea or What's your Name or something like that. You know, there was just like these like these you know, the billy porters out here and that you know that they were doing stuff, and and I was like, wow, those black boy joy going out, and I was saying all this beforehand, and then to have this stuff happened now. And then the way the ballroom is and what you have to understand is that you're not gonna walk into a ball room and then you gotta come and take it over and use it. Just to use it. You know, you're gonna respect us, You're gonna respect them. You gotta respect what they do. So the ball room is a safe space. It's this place of of of togetherness. The ball is, it's a place of of art. There's a place of creativity that you will come and no matter what you look like, no matter if you got one arm and three legs and and five tips and whatever you look like, you would come to the ballroom and you can get your tents and feel over that speaks volumes. They do not describe, they don't way. They discriminate you if you're not bringing it. So I advise you to bring it and bring it as fierce as you get. And if you don't know how to do it, your mother or somebody out there will pick you up. Give you the name and they will teach you how to be fierce. So that's what's about and you'll have that for the rest of your life. I'm a product of it, and I'm so proud of the ball Room. I'm so proud of what they're doing. I'm so proud of my my um My people. With Vogue dance is our we developed, we made that. That's our dance,...

...our gay dance. That's how um cultures do. I mean, we have our own dance, our own music, everything. Those things just so incredible. Well, I definitely think that you have done that, and I think everything that you just talked about the influence of queer culture on mainstream culture, it is very apparent in Pure Slash Honey. It feels like that song could have played in the nineties out of ball Room and it would have just would it would have been. It would be totally a bit tracked for that time. The way she does it when she goes out, she goes it takes to me and to look this Canty County. Oh my god. But didn't I love about her for that? I love everything she does. I love I love the way she holds her people up. You know, the gay, gay black people you know, there's just dis chord is between the straight people that are like, you know straight, and you know there's always been like this kind of drama. Mind you, in every gay favorite family, there's somebody gay. In the black family, there's somebody gay. Okay, it's not like the first time they see Auntie or or seeing that miss staying in address or whatever, or we call the girl. This is normal. It's a normal thing. But you know, thank you be, thank you be, thank you Beyonce, thank you girl. I know a lot of people were so excited when they saw just the amount of people that Beyonce, like you said, picked up with her on that album and and sampled their music and brought people who have been working a really long time and deserve exposure, deserved to have all of their work scene. What I really love about it. You know, you have somebody like more Renee who's now along here with us on the album. Then you have somebody like Sid who did the song um Plastic off my Sofa, who's amazing vocalist, this lesbian girl, she's amazing because she's amazing, right, it is like one of my favorite and you know she wrote this song and did hear to hear Beyonce sing this song. I don't know if she's is more like it's more like her singing her trance, like transporting herself to this world, and or she really...

...maybe she just push to start. All I know is that I hear her, you know, I hear sit through this song, and I love, love love that. I love how you can still hear the artists through Beyonce, you know what I mean? They you know, they take it all she's you know, she steals and she no, no, that's that's what she does. Beyonce wraps her head and her body everything around the project and she does it. And that's what they need to understand. I'm so happy that. You know, if I had any pardon all this, I think it's you know, my job is done, you know what I mean. That's that's but it's not done. I'm not finished it up. No, it's not done. In fact, didn't you you just dropped a new single I'm Back, which I really want to know about. Is it a Beyonce? And so I had nothing to do with that. It was mostly about the pandemic, That's what it's about. So it's just great timing. Yeah, great timing, yeah, and go me, DJ go me and just be who We worked together a lot, and so did go me and I was just like, you know which where he goes, I would look called so I'm back, because said, yeah, but I never really left. He goes, it's not about you. He said, you want to do about the club? I said, okay, I said, we was just making about New York, you know, so we made about New York children, like on the picture the frame the leader. I'm bad. Thank you so much for sharing all of your your stories today with our listeners. Um, where can everyone follow you? You know what? I am a I'm not a big Facebook find so I mostly on Instagram, so you find me there. Kevin All Beyonce Official. UM, I am have a residency at the Q Club every Thursday. So when it comes to the town or whatever, come to the Thursday party and they're either upstairs and speaking, you'll find me in there some some of the corner d jays there or performing in the...

...corner or whatever. And then I'm coming to a city near you soon. Um working on new music and the Woman's Show. Well, thank you so so much for coming again. Today. Thank you, Thank you. Pride is a production of straw Hut Media. If you like the show, please leave us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or ever you listen to podcasts. Then follow us on TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, and Twitter at Pride and tune in weekly for more episodes. Be sure to show this episode with your friends and subscribe for more stories from amazing queer people. And if you'd like to connect with me, you can follow me everywhere at Levy Chambers. Pride is produced by me Levi Chambers, Maggie Bowls, Ryan Tillottson, and Brandon Marlowe. This episode was written by Maggie Bowls and edited by Daniel Ferrara. Have a queer story to share, reach out to us. You can email us at Pride at straw hut media dot com. We'd love to hear from you.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (151)