Coming Out in the Outback with Mitchell Coombs
PRIDE
PRIDE

Episode · 3 years ago

Coming Out in the Outback with Mitchell Coombs

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Mitchell Coombs, once a Youtuber, is now a successful radio and podcast producer living and working in Sydney, Australia. Let’s talk about radio, autism, toenail polish, sheep farming, and more.

Be sure to follow Mitchell on IG and listen to his podcast! Your host is Levi Chambers, co-founder of Gayety. Follow the show and keep up with the conversation @Pride. Want more great shows from Straw Hut Media? Check out or website at strawhutmedia.com. Your producers are Levi Chambers, Maggie Boles, Ryan Tillotson and Edited by Sebastian Alcala Have an interesting LGBTQ+ story to share? We might feature U! Email us at lgbtq@strawhutmedia.com. *This podcast is not affiliated with Pride Media. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Straw media. He's just twenty three years old, but already Mitchell coombs is making waves and radio, podcasting and new media. You may have seen some of his viral videos, the tour of his hometown of Boganate, the rant about being harassed on a bus in Sydney for having painted toenails, or maybe when he accidentally got a blow out after a haircut and showed off his beautiful bouncy locks. It's a bright day for young, talented queer personalities. Today we're talking to Mitchell from all the way across the world about sheep farming, autism, podcasting and so much more. I'M LEA by chambers and this is pride. I've only just hit record, so from now on his way they're going to hear my voice. Amazing. So first, could you introduce yourself? Sure, I'm Mitchell combs, I'm Australian, I work in media, I host a podcast, I live in Sydney. I don't even know what else to say. What would you say? Mitchell started a podcast from his dorm room with two friends in November two thousand and sixteen. It was called not my cup of tea and was later picked up by the local radio station. Not My cup of tea is in the archive now. Definitely still go listen. But the part he's currently cohosting is brand new. It's called is it just me, and I cohost it with another guy, also called Mitch. So if you just search couple of Mitches, one word, the same way that you would spell a couple of bitches, if you search couple of Mitches, one word, you'll find the podcast called is it just me. I would say that it's observational. It's observational comedy style. It's it's kind of got the same essence of a radio show in Australia because we both listen to radio, work in radio and enjoy radio. So I guess it's this kind of a given that will be influenced by that kind of style of presenting. But yeah, radio and Australia is very different. Like what's radio like over there in La you know, I would say in some ways it's similar, because I've I mean I don't, I don't listen to a radio, obviously, but I see on the instagram. So in some ways talk radio, especially in the mornings, is similar. I think. I think it's okay. Yeah, I've just been told by people that live overseas at Australian radio is far more like, I don't even know, like really, do you think it's more like a driven yes, I do think it's more like that. Yes, like people in Australia. There they aren't afraid to stuff up on air, whereas I think overseas radio shows put a lot of emphasis on being really slick and perfect rights. Here we're just like whatever, super relaxed, chilled out whatever. That makes it fun, though. Okay, so when did you start the podcast? We've been working on it since June.

Actually, I used to host a podcast called not my cup of tea, and that was the weirdest experience because we just said, me and my friend to Licia at the time, we would just like we should start a podcast and call it not my cup of tea. The next day we just started recording and we just made it up as we went along. But this one is it just me. We put a lot more thought and preparation into it. So we started recording things around June and we had a basic idea and like demo's done, and it wasn't until it was late September that we were able to launch. I think so. It's only been around for a little bit of actually, I think it was early October that we've eventually launched, so we've only been around for a month now. But yeah, we're pretty tough. We got tenzero listens in that first month. So yeah, we're pretty happy. It's so far, so good. Before has dive and a podcast and radio producing. Mitchell was always a selfdescribed media nerd. He spent his formative years listening to the Kyle and Jack Ee oh show like religiously. I loved it. I now work for Kylin Dakio. I'm one of their behind the scenes produce the type people. I do their social media, their videos, their podcast and stuff like that. But long before I ever worked for Kylin Dakio, I should probably explain who they are, shouldn't i? God, it's okay if you don't know who Kyle and Jack Yo are. Mitchell started working for their show in March of two thousand and eighteen, just about thirteen years after it first aired on Australian radio. Their breakfast show is the number one morning show in Australia, but they probably one of the biggest shows in the world to be honest. Yeah, they're a big deal in Australia and beyond. Actually, this year Kyle and Jackieo signed the biggest media deal in Australian history. They're expected to take home seven to eight million Australian dollars per year. With their new contracts. In US dollars that's closer to five million, but still it's a lot of clams for a couple of media nerds. Whee lely enough, I also used to listen to this podcast called the mindful kind. The mindful kind, on the other hand, is hosted by Rachel Cable, a blogger and podcaster who makes content to encourage people to live mindfully in quote, Fun, simple and meaningful ways. So we've got a bit of a Yin and Yang thing happening with Mitchell, because the Colin Jacky I show, obviously, is quite, you know, well produced and energetic and fast paced, and I think listening to the mindful kind with my first taste of real like podcast to style of presenting, you know what I mean, like it was super raw and they probably only went for like ten minutes. Each day's episodes. Carlin Jack Yo were like three to four hours long daily. But these mind when it's podcasts and I would say that the host, Rachel, doesn't have a typical radio voice like she is a really great presenter and I connect really well with that style of presenting. But I remember being surprised that was my first taste of a podcast, you know what I mean, like it was super relaxed, super chill. You hear a different voice that you wouldn't usually hear on radio and yeah, I was surprised at how well I was I would connect with that. So I think now I'm not afraid to be a little bit more chill, because there used...

...to be very used to be. The goal used to be to try and sound like a radio show, all super slick and super energetic and super well produced. But yeah, I don't mind being a little bit chilled now, like a podcast. Beyond being a media junkie in general, Mitchell has always had a deep love for radio. He used to listen to the local radio station every day while growing up in his hometown of Bugan Gate. Like I'd have the little clock radio that would wake me up and I really enjoyed listening to their breakfast show and I knew that I wanted to do something in the area of radio not necessarily presenting because, much like I just mentioned about Rachel Cable, I wouldn't say that I have a radio voice like you wouldn't hear a voice like mine, you know, super high pitched and list we on radio like I get confused for a frigging woman all the time. I'm not one, just for the record. So I knew that I wanted to play in the area of Radio Somehow, but I just took me while to figure out what exactly I wanted to do, which, as it turns out, is the digital side of things. So, like I mentioned videos, social media and PODCASTS, I recently have been doing some TV bits and pieces for one of the morning shows over here called studio ten, and that opportunity came about because of my youtube videos. Actually. So, even though I said that Youtube was never something that I really loved doing because it made me feel a little bit unnatural trying to be on camera, it did open a lot of doors for me because one of the hosts of studio ten, the morning show on channel ten over here, they saw one of my videos where I was just reacting to daytime TV. I had a day off, I just set up a camera, I watched morning TV, you know, Oprah, Doctor Phil all that, and I was just commentating what I was saying, and Studio Ten was one morning show that I commented on and I must have said Nice things about that show because this particular host, Sarah Harris, followed me and she has followed me on Instagram for some time and must just enjoy what I do and the things I'm making because, yeah, the studio ten senior producer and executive producer reached out, wanted to have coffee and they asked me if I wanted to do some reporting for them and I couldn't believe that that came about because I was a bit of a TV and radio nerd back as a teenager when I was living in Bowden Gate, and I recall the day that studio ten launch that TV show. I pretended to be sick, like I stayed home from school, pretending to be sick just because I wanted to watch it. And so it was weird when I was given the opportunity to do on air presenting for studio ten and when I was watching it back I was just like Ah, like young little TV nerd Mitchell back in the country. Literally would not believe would not believe it if you told him that this is where he'd been living in Sydney reporting on studio ten. So you know it was it was a fun opportunity and it was nice to happen and I definitely it was one of those pinches self moments. Mitchell's first vieral video...

...was literally a tour of his hometown, a very, very small town in New South Wales, about six hours from Sydney. Yes, I suppose it's what someone in America might call the outback round boats in the central west of New South Wales, which is around about six hours from the coast and according to the sign we have a population of two hundred people that I did not believe that for a second. Unless they're including flies, I highly doubt there is that many people. Grew up down town in the middle of New South Wales, so probably seven hours West from Sydney, on a farm. It was in a town called Bogan Gate. Now people in America that probably doesn't mean anything the term Bogn Gate, but I think the word Bogan is kind of on part with what you would call a redneck like. It's not a compliment, you know what I'm saying. So living in a town called bogen gate. It did lend itself to a bit of, you know, mockery. But yes, I grew up in a town called bogn gates. Super Tiny, super rural. If you google it you'll find the video that I made giving a tour of my hometown, which ended up going quite viral in the end. But yeah, it was called Bogan Gate to my parents were farmers. This is one of our churches and, as a matter of fact, it was actually my great grandfather. Oh my God, it's a snake. Not even getting about. Now there's a freaking brown snake. We're doing this situation. I supposed to say? So, Oh my God, it's moving out. Oh, that's a lick, that's a listard, that's not a snake. Well, that's less scary. Little turds going into the outhouse. Okay. So, as I was saying before, I nearly died. My great great grandfather, Mark William coombs the first, was one of the people that built this church and now my brother is Mark William Coombe's the third, because I'm not special enough to carry on the family name. So yes, grew up on the farm with my parents, on a sheep farm. I don't think it was ever expected when I was growing up that I was going to remain living that lifestyle. I don't think there was any part of my parents or family that was surprised when I moved away from the farm to do what I'm doing now. I don't think it was ever even discussed if I was going to stay living on the farm and continuing as a farmer because, let's be real, I was completely freaking useless on the farm. Like my dad would ask to my help with, you know, sheep work and whatever and I was just completely hopeless it do was. It was not my thing and I don't think it'll ever be my thing, which I don't think it's any surprise to my family because they they knew that I was always interested in media. So I think it was clear that I was going to pursue that. No hard feelings from his parents when Mitchell wasn't super into carrying on the family business. They were consistently supportive of his choice to pursue a career in the city. So when he found a media course six hours away in Sydney, he told them he wanted to take it and they were like all right, well, I guess swim moving you to Sydney. They would just they would just roll with the punches, which I guess I'm really lucky to be able to say that that was the case. They were pretty patient in terms of letting me figure out what exactly I wanted it. What did to do because, like I said, I knew that I wanted to do something...

...in the area of media and specifically radio. I didn't know whether I wanted to be a journalist. I ended up pursuing the journalism thing briefly and then realizing that that was a terrible idea and I would be a shit journalist because that involves being informed about the news. Who Cares? And but yeah, they were super supportive and it wasn't a surprise when this is what I wanted to do. So they you don't think they ever expected you to like take on the family business? I don't think they ever expected me to take on the family business. It's a running joke that they won't be putting me in the wheel because if I inherit the farm, I'll just sell it straight away. They're like no, you'll just sell it. If we handed over to you, you'd get rid of the farm and I was like. I'm not that Brood led. I didn't like I could never live on the farm, but I don't hate it that much that I would just sell it. When we come back the joys of sheep farming, Gay Liberty, success and coming out in the Australian outback. Oh my coming out, storry guy. We're going back not too long actually. I'm no good at maths. Can you tell me? I'm twenty three now and I came out eighteen. How many years ago was that? So that would be five years. There we go, five years ago. It actually wasn't one of those stereotypical stories where I always you that I was gay. I just I was too scared to say anything. It actually was just a case of I realized quite late on. Sorry about that banging in the background. I'm not sure what construction is happening around my partment right now, but we'll push on. So it was probably only like seventeen when I realized that I was not straight. I was literally dating girls in high school and I think it was it was one of those moments where you'd like stare at another guy, for example, and you'd Think, Oh shit, he's good looking. I used to think it was his jealousy. I was like, oh, he's really good looking. I wish I looked like that, and then I realized after a while that it wasn't just jealousy, it was also attraction. So that that that's really how the penny is it. Penny dropped us out of saying that's how I realized, I would say, and I started telling people. I've told a few close friends after my eighteen birthday, so when July, and then by the time I finished school in like September, I think most people knew. So I didn't really have that experience of being out and proud in high school because I waited so long until being in high school to actually tell everyone. But one of my close friends I told when we were at a lady Gaga concert in Sydney. The fact that my dad brought me down to Sydney for a lady Gaga concert should have just been self explanatory that I was going to be coming out as gay eventually. Like, I don't know, I'll clearly wasn't being very subtle about it, but yeah, that's that's what happened. There wasn't...

...much pushback. I think I was way more nervous about coming out than I needed to be because I expected that it would there would be some sort of turbulence, I suppose, but they're really there wasn't much. I look back and I'm not traumatized by the experience, which is a good thing. There was a little bit of tension within the family with certain people who had religious beliefs that, you know, being a kind of went against. But fast forward to now and like we're past that, so it's not a problem. I'm pretty lucky in that way. So, were there other lgbtq people in Bogn Gate or you know what I mean, like, were you the only gay in the village? There were absolutely no other lgbt people in Bowden Gate to my knowledge, and when the video of me giving a home to giving a tour of my hometown, boat and gate, went viral online, that was the comment that was most popular. Every one's commenting, oh, it's the only game in the village, which they were absolutely correct. I still am not aware of any openly gay people that live in bogen gate. There's a few surrounding towns, like parks and forbs nearby, where I know there's a few gay queer lesbian people, whatever you want to say, but there was certainly none in my high school at the time when I came out. Well, I should say there were no openly gay people in my high school when I came out. So there were any other people going through what I went through at the time. So was bullying a big thing in bogn gate or like here? I feel like if you live in a rural place, like I'm from Arizona, from the stacks, it is kind of I mean there's definitely a lot of bullying and a lot of homophobia. Did you encounter that in Bilgan Gate? It's funny because when I think about bullying and homophobia back in my hometown, I remember being really fearful that it was gonna happen. So I remember being really quite reserved and really really anxious, certainly in my earlier teenage is, so like maybe thirteen to seventeen, and this was just for for you, that I would be bullied. But looking back, I don't recall ever actually being bullied. Like there was, you know, your light teasing that happens in high school. Like people mostly just made fun of me for being fat and annoying, like it wasn't a gay thing. So you know, I wasn't saying that. I went I went through high school being completely never teased or mocked before, but there wasn't anything like really traumatizing. To tell you the truth, I was quite lucky people. A lot of people assume that being in a rural area and being so flamboyant that that would be something you'd be bullied about, but everyone in the country is fairly like, you know, love thy neighbor. They just get on with it. It's not really a problem. So No, I haven't experienced any bullying to be honest, out in the country. So being queer wasn't the hardest part about growing up down under. Maybe it was actually the sheep, I know. Well, here's the thing. It's a shit job. So I don't know. I don't know. It's it shouldn't be a surprise to anyone that no wants to do it. Who wants to sign up for bloody sheep farming? They're insufferable sheep, but the worst animals. I've lost all...

...empathy towards sheet because they're just so dumb and frustrating if you're trying to work with them. They're just the worst. I was really hoping to learn some cool Australian slang, but unfortunately Mitchell couldn't think of anything to share. I told him about the term gay liberty, hoping to spark his memory, but no luck, not that I can think of. I know you mean my gay Lebrity though, because we I was talking to one of my colleagues the other day because Carlin Jackio, like I said, very big radio show in Australia and worldwide, and then news right up, Brooklyn Ross is scay and he's like one of the only few people in Australia that's like really openly gay on air and we were talking about the fact that no one gives a shit about who we are most times of the day, but when we go to Oxford Street in Sydney, which is like the iconic gays trip with all the gay clubs in Sydney every time we go there, that's where we get the most recognition, like me from my videos and podcasts and whatever, him from Carlin Dechio. But outside of that little gay bubble of Oxford Street, absolutely no one knows who we are and could not care less. So what you're saying is you're a gay liberty. I think I could possibly be. I hate labeling myself that way, I but I've been told that that's the case. I don't think I'm a gay Lebrity, to be honest. Even if he doesn't believe he's arrived quite yet, I think Mitchell is well on his way to gay liberty status. During his youtube and facebook video days he was getting mill alliend of views. Yeah, so I used to be, for want of a better term, a youtuber. That was what I was trying to do. Well at I never really loved being on camera. I still really don't. I think that's why I'm focusing mostly on podcasts and stuff because, like I I've got like high functioning autism spectrum disorders. Eye contact doesn't bode overly well for me. So sitting at a camera and just like making direct eye contact to it, like a lot of youtubers do, it just never felt natural, which is why I love doing podcasts and stuff, because I can just rely on my voice to express what I'm trying to express and there's no risk of being misread because our I'm fidgeting or, you know, my body language suggested I'm uncomfortable. It's all just in the voice, which I think is awesome. So that's what I preferred doing. But when I was doing youtube and making videos, I think I had about one viral video per year. When he was eighteen, he had the Bogan Gate tour. Two thousand and seventeen was the tone. Now Polish video, the imagined. Will come back to that one. Two Thousand and eighteen was a video that I made giving my sister baby name ideas and they were like absurd names. I was like following her around the house being like, what about tesselate? What about shot truth, like all these absurd names. So people tagging their friends and that that one was one of my top performance to this day. And then, most recently, I did a video when I was leaving the hair dresses and I accidentally agreed to a blow dry, which is, you...

...know that whatever they do with the hair dryer and the brush that makes your hair look all like Silky and Bouncy. I looked like one of those female news readers with the BOB on TV, and it's because I didn't know what a blow dry meant, because the hair dresser was like, do want a blow dry? Ice I took it literally. In just thought they were going to dry my hair so that it wasn't wet and then so, yes, I took a video straight after I left the hair dresses with my blow dry that I'd accidentally agree to, and so that's become one of my most viewed videos ever, but I think to this day the one that still has the most amount of views is that two thousand and seventeen one that you mentioned with the tone out Polish. So what happened there was I was on public transport, I was catching a bus and I painted my toes green and because I was wearing songs, which is, you know, flip flops if you're American, and I think some kid on the bus, from memory he was making, he pointed out to the person that he was sitting with on the bus that he's wearing tonail Polish water in the news, that the gay slur beginning with F. I'm not sure if it's appropriate to say on this particular podycast, but yes, he called me the f word and then I think his girlfriend ended up like clapping back saying yeah, well, he's got nicer tonails than me, and then in the video I just said suck did I've got nicer tonails than your girlfriend, which I didn't think was that funny. That I was got if often, if I'm in the mood to runt, I'll just whip out my mobile phone and like, aren't talking to the camera in the heat of the moment, and that was one of those. And for some reason this particular one blew up and it got millions of years on Facebok. I can't remember how many exactly. It has seven point five million viewers. Oh, WHO's my girl? You're my girl. Let's right, son, I've got better tone mouth than your fucking girlfriend. Go back to Bankstown, Barock, or whatever the fuck you stupid name is. I hypeer turns that guy. That's quite like. When we come back we'll talk more about artism, mental health, embracing Oh keyness, and finally will learn some cool Australian slang. So I was only diagnosed with autism, spection disordered, the skier, and it's because there was a reality TV show over here in Australia and one of the contestants everyone was suspecting was like on the autism spectrum and I overheard people in my office talking about this particular person on the reality show. They're like, oh, he's autistic for sure, and they were like what makes you say that, and they were rattling off all these symptoms. They were like, oh, because he doesn't like making eye contact, blah, Blah Blah. I can't remember this the exact symptoms that they were listening but they rattle of all these things and I was like, Holy Shit, I do all of those things. Could I be autistic as well? Amo on the autism spectrum, and when I went to the psychologist I mentioned it...

...and they were like okay, sure, we'll go through these series of questions and tests and Blah Blah, Blah Blah. And what they ended up concluding with, yeah, you're on. You've got autism spectrum disorder, which is what they used to call as Birges, which is essentially like I'm really high functioning, but I've got a lot of the symptoms that kind of get in the way of everyday life for autistic people, I suppose. And that was actually quite a relief getting diagnosed with that, because it was kind of like I made a lot more sense to myself, because there were all these things that I used to think, we're flaws, that I had, like Oh, the fact that I'm bad with eye contact, the fact that I'm a bit socially awkward, the fact that I don't often nail social cues and body language and stuff like that. I used to think that they were character flaws, but then I was just like, oh now I've got this diagnosis autos inspectrum disorder. So it kind of just gave myself permission to be okay with those things, and so now I don't really beat myself up about that stuff and I don't put pressure on myself to not show those traits. You know what I mean, like if someone says to me, Oh, you came across is really rude. In that scenario I can now say, well, I know that I'm not rude, like I know I'm a good person, but people misread me because of whatever reason, you know, because I don't articulate my body language well and I don't read social cues well. It's it was funny because this particular psychology does she basically diagnosed me with a resting bitch face. It was hilarious. She goes like sometimes your voice and the way you're what you're trying to articulate is perfectly fine, but your face just doesn't match it. So like you can be really happy but you just don't know how to express that with your factual expressions. And I was like, there we go, I've been medically diagnosed with a resting bitch face, which, like I mentioned, is one of the reasons that I preferred doing audio content as opposed to video content, because that layer of pressure is removed. I can just focus on my voice. Mitchell said that if you had been diagnosed as a teenager, it might not have felt like such a relief because there is a stigma that exists around autism. But in this day and age, when I'm not really like concerned about that sort of stigma, where I'm just focused on trying to get through the day, it was a massive relief because, like I said, I just I made a lot more sense to myself after that and it made me understand autism a lot more, because I did a lot of research, naturally, about it and fortunately I am already on medication for attention deficit disorder and they said to me, well, the prescript the medication we would usually prescribe for someone who's struggling with autism spectrum disorder, is what you're already taking. So that's probably why I'm already high functioning, because I'm already on the right medication, which was terribly convenient. But yeah,...

...it was a relief. It really didn't concern me and it actually it was a bit of a weight off my shoulders that I had an answer for a lot of questions about why I do or say certain things. So has that affected relationships in terms of like dating? Yeah, totally. In terms of dating, it made it explained a lot of things that might have gone wrong in past relationships and dating in terms of this little things like that, because so much of dating is it goes against everything that people with autism struggle with. You know, nonverbal communication. There's so much in that and, like I mentioned, eye contact like that is one of the key things to trying to tell someone that you're attracted to them. Is it making the right amount of eye contact. So of course that's going to be a bit of a barrier for me to know. I'm saying so, and I'm there's been a couple of times in the past. I'm going to get really over the top here. There's been a couple of times in the past when people have said to me, Hey, I don't know if you picked up on this last night, but like I was trying to fuck you and you just weren't reciprocating and I was like, Oh, I didn't know, like you want. You didn't tell me that. So I've just had to decide explaining to people when I'm dating them. This happened quite recently with someone that I was saying not seeing them anymore, but I just said, can you just be as literal as possible, like I don't want you to if you're trying to crack on to me, I don't want you to say things like hey, should we closed the door like because that I'm just going to say no, there's a nice breeze, I like the breeze. No, don't close the door. So if you're trying to crack on, you just going to have to be superliteral to know I'm saying. And this particular person that I was dating was on the spectrum themselves, so we really understood each other in that way. But it'll be interesting going forward any further people that I date and I have to explain to them. Listen, this is going to be a different experience to what you used to because all the body language and those sorts of cues that you would usually use indicate the attracted to someone. They might go completely unnoticed by me and I don't want you to be offended by that. So, yeah, I've just had to I've just so. I just figured that I'm going to have to explain that to people from the get go. Whether people are understanding of that when I'm dating them is remains to be seen, I suppose. Can you explain to me what crack on means? I'm an American to don't Oh, you're American. You don't know what crack on means. That means like make a move, like, you know, initiate some sort of physical or contact of whatever, you know, like are flirting. Basically, okay, crack on like these. There's something, someone attractive at the Bar and I'm going to crack onto them. You know what I mean. It never God to me that you wouldn't know what cracking on me is. Oh God, I'm too Australian for my own good. Working for a morning radio show means long hours and early mornings and as a person trying to build their career, it can be a struggle to find a healthy balance. I've always had depression and anxiety and that's, you know, made itself more known sometimes than others. But the start of this ye here,...

I think I was just trying to I don't know, I was trying to learn my limits, put it that way, because I was trying to do really well at work, I was trying to do really well at the Jim. I just sign up with a trainer and I I was still trying to do not my cup of tea, the podcast that I used to work on, and that was a really, really time consuming show. Like we tried to make it as good as it could be and I probably put myself under a lot of pressure to make it absolutely perfect and, like you know, paid a lot of attention to detail. The probably no one even notice. And so I remember just being exhausted around March, got I want to say March, April, this like that time of year, and I ended up having a panic attack actually at work. It was six PM on a Friday night and I start work every morning for Carl and Jackio. It's a breakfast radio show, so I started thirty every morning and I was still there at zero pm on a Friday night. I was just exhausted. I was waiting for Tolicia and Ashland to show up to record. Not My cup of tea. And Yeah, I just had a panic attack and I was like crying on the office floor and I end up calling them and just being like don't bother coming in, I'm going to hospital, which I did, and at the time I didn't realize it was a panic attack. I thought that I had some sort of like heart problem. It later turned out to just be that and that I was working myself too hard. And there's a term they use, I think it's anxiety hangover. So even in the actual panic attack moment, yeah, it feels pretty rubbish, but it's actually the days after where you feel the most rubbish. I just remember being in bed after having this panic attack because I was trying to be like really I was trying to nail everything that I was attempting. I wanted to be great at work, great at the gym, great at this podcast is great at everything. I wanted to be great at relationships. I was putting myself under pressure, of pressure for not dating enough whatever, and then yet everything just built up and I was working myself too hard and then I had the panic attack and I was just when I was also living in new town at the time, which was a suburb in Sydney. That was not easy and autistic kid from the suburb, from the country to live in. It was too many people, like too many cars, it was difficult to park, and these things sound really trivial, but it was actually really like affecting my day, like I was driving around the street for twenty minutes a day trying to find a frigging parking spot. It was just not what I'm used to, not well out of my comfort zone. I just wasn't wasn't enjoying life at that time. So I was just in bed. Are having an anxiety hangover, as they call it, and I was just like, Oh God, I'm trying so hard and this is the result, and so I don't know, that's when I started saying the psychologist and then ended up being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, like I mentioned. So I would say that was the lowest slow but it also it's one of those things where I'm like it needed to happen, because it did. It let me reassess everything and so, you know, I'm still trying to attempt all the things that I was attempting at that time. But I guess I've I think I've given myself permission to just be okay...

...at everything, you know what I mean. So some days I might go to the gym and I don't actually do the exact amount of, you know, reps, or I don't go there for as long as my trainer actually wants me to be there as per the program they've written. But I'm like, you know what, I could be at home in bed right now doing nothing. So I'm just I'm here at the gym, I'm trying, I'm super tired, I'm going to even if it's Halfass, it's still something, you know what I mean. So at the end of the day I just know that I'm trying my best. I might not be nailing it, but hey, it's better than having a panic attack on the office floor. I feel like that's good advice for everyone to like it's okay to be okay. It's okay to just be okay. You did an okay job, you know what I mean. Like yeah, like you don't have to nail it every time. And then when you're expecting yourself to nail it every time, you're going to end up failing in a bigger way than you would have failed before. So like, I feel like putting itself on a heap of pressure and making yourself feel like you fail at something that that feels like more of a value than if you actually know. One of trying to say is it's okay to just be okay at things. You don't have to excel at everything. And I remember at the time I was also beating myself up for losing points on my license because I was caught speeding. You know what, I'm not a great driver, but I'm an okay driver, and I'm not the best podcast presenter, but I'm an okay one. Some people enjoy what I do. It's fine that I'm not, you know, superb, that I'm not getting. I'm not going super viral with my podcast. I mean I'm very happy with the number of listens we're getting on. Is it just me? We got ten thousand in the first month, but which was awesome. But yes, it's it really comes back to just being okay with being okay at everything. The moral of that story give yourself a break when you need one. Give yourself permission to take it easy. Don't put so much pressure on yourself to be perfect. Take a look around and you might realize that things are actually pretty good. I'm pretty happy with where I'm at the moment. So I, like I mentioned, I work for the Carlin Jack Yo show at kiss in Sydney and I remember when I was nineteen doing media studies, I made the goal of working for them by the time I was twenty five, and so when I got the job at twenty one, I was like, okay, I don't think I need to have a next set planned because I'm allowed to be here for a little while because that was the plan. So yeah, sometimes I get stressed that I'm not thinking about what's next, but I like my job. I like the podcast I'm working on, like I mentioned earlier. It's called is it just me? You can search is it just me or couple of Mitches, one word. That's where we are in socials as well. So just a couple of Mitches on instagram. I'm really enjoying that podcast that I'm working on. It's it's different to the old show I used to do. Not My cuver tea, but very similar essence. So yeah, it's a lot of fun working with the other Mitch. So yes, people can go check that one out. Is it just me and professionally and I'm happy with what I'm doing? I don't know. I really don't have an answer to what's next. I guess I'll just keep carrying...

...on until I get sick of it. Fingers Christ Mitchell doesn't get sick of it because we're really into its content. My instagram is just at Mitchell combs. I don't know if I need to spell that. I assume my name is written somewhere in this podcast, so you can just read it there. But it's Mitchell coombs. One Word on instagram. I feel like if I've got the opportunity to plug it would be a waste not to say go follow couple of Mitches, because that's that's my baby right now. I do have my facebook page. That's where I get the most amount of traction in terms of my videos. That's what I have the most amount of follower. So if you're if you're on facebook, sure go like my page. It's Mitchell combs, but otherwise I'd much rather if you're going to if you're going to give me the time of day and you're going to go bother s talking me I'd much rather you stalk my podcast couple of Mitches. Thanks for listening. Pride is a production of Straw her media. If you like the show, leave us a reading and a review on Apple, podcast, spotify or wherever you're tuning in from. Share us with your friends, subscribe and follow us on Instagram, facebook and twitter at pray. You can follow me at lead by chambers. Pride is produced by me, Maggie Bowls and Ryan Tillotson, edited by Sebastian Alcala. Special shout out to some of the towns surrounding bogangate that I learned from Google maps. UTHA, Willu gem along, Darubalgi, who nambla coocamajera and bumboree ti paper. You listening to my crotch? Okay, hi,.

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