A Tall Glass of Sherry Cola
PRIDE
PRIDE

Episode · 2 years ago

A Tall Glass of Sherry Cola

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Sherry Cola AKA Lil Tasty AKA Alice on Good Trouble is hilarious, she’s talented, and her career is taking off. And she teaches us a very helpful phrase in Shanghainese. Be sure to follow Sherry on IG! @shrrycola Your host is Levi Chambers, co-founder of Gayety. Follow the show and keep up with the conversation @Pride. Want more great shows from Straw Hut Media? Check out or website at strawhutmedia.com. Your producers are Levi Chambers, Maggie Boles, Ryan Tillotson and Edited by Sebastian Alcala Have an interesting LGBTQ+ story to share? We might feature U! Email us at lgbtq@strawhutmedia.com. *This podcast is not affiliated with Pride Media. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Straw hut media. We talk a lot about the power of representation in the media on this show, but what exactly do we mean when we say it and why does it matter so much? Everything you watch, read and listen to tells a story. In those stories, the story tellers try to make sense of what they think is important or funny or moving or interesting. So when the story tellers are primarily straight white, sisgendered men of a certain age, as they have them historically in Hollywood, you end up with a lot of stories about, you guessed it, straight white, cistendered men of a certain age. And even if that categorization doesn't describe you or even the majority of Americans, people in that category have been the ones with the most access and the largest platforms. As people who don't fit into what would appear to be the American mainstream, a lot of us go through our formative years and beyond with a lot of unanswered questions. We might ask if there isn't a place for me in movies, TV and books, is there a place for me anywhere? And when we do see people similar to us, it's often through the eyes of an outsider, which leads to one dimensional and token characters. It's infuriating, but it is getting better. As a performer outside the narrow confines of what Hollywood has historically deemed star material, it isn't often that you get an opportunity to portray a character that encompasses a lot of your own personal qualities. When my guest today audition for the part of Alice on the series good trouble, she got that opportunity. Today we talked to the Hilarious hrry Coola about her career as a stand up comedian and an actor, the movement of representation of Asian faces and TV and movies, and she'll teach us a very important and useful phrase in Shanghai knees. I'M LEA by Chambers, and this is pride. You are on the record. This is the official audio taping of my memoir. Exactly. Surprise already ready. Yes, okay, could you introduce yourself? What's going on? My Name Is Cherry Kola Cola, no relation to Ricola, the cough drop. Common misconception. Born in Shanghai, shary moved to the US in one thousand nine hundred and ninety four with her parents when she was four years old, and we went to all Hambra and then eventually made our way to temple city. So I grew up for the most part in the six two six. We like to call it San Gabriel Valley, which is, you know, a big juicy plate of Asians, you know what I mean. So it was cool being close to my culture. A big juicy plate is the perfect way to to scribe the San Gabriel Valley, which is now famous for its fantastic Chinese restaurants, thanks in large part to the Pulitzer Prize winning food critic and La Culinary icon Jonathan Gold. My parents had a restaurant. Actually, they opened a restaurant when I was in fifth grade and they still have it and it's like a nice little mom and pop joint in San Gabriel and people really like it's cheap, it's delicious and my parents are divorced now but they still have the restaurant. So that's a pilot that I'm writing together. No, just me. Sherry stayed local for college and attended cal State Fullerton, where she majored in communications with an emphasis and entertainment studies. She says it was a bit of a random choice but sounded like a safe way to stay involved in what she liked. I wasn't a hundred percent sure exactly what I wanted to do, but I had things that I like to do, you know what I mean, like in high school I hosted the talent show. I, you know, was in this film club where we made funny videos. I did a...

...hope, bunch of things that kind of express my personality and I was always like I loved making people laugh, like that was a constant my entire life, you know. So it was interesting that I didn't realize it was a possibility to kind of do it as an endgame, and truly it might be, you know, the lack of representation, especially at that time, like maybe I just didn't think it was possible because I especially because, being an immigrant, I kind of always had that, you know, foreigner feeling, if you will, like we're oh, well, TV and movies, that's for Americans, you know what I mean? Something like that, especially not seeing myself on the screen. So I kind of just went to college and, you know, majored and something generic, you know, just to get a degree, and I actually found radio in college. So I did campus radio for three and a half years and I kind of just fell in love with it and I thought, okay, maybe this is what I'll pursue. After she graduated, she got a job at am radio, ninety seven point one FM. Started from the bottom. I mean that's what you know as someone who wants to pursue radios, that you literally have to get your foot in the door at the bottom of the ladder, you know. So I did Promo team. I'm talking like passing stickers out at a concert, you know what I mean, setting up tense at a metro pcs, like, you know, street team stuff, and then I started doing some social media and then I started a board opping on the weekends, you know, I would go on the street at events and and get sound bites from listeners like so I started to do more and more because that's that was my goal. And about two and a half years into her job at the radio station she started performing stand up. It was like a show and Fullerton, like one of the Dudes from K Rock, which was our sister station, started are he just like put on a comedy show, you know, and my boss kind of convinced me to do it. I'm like, I've literally been dying to do this for real. Let me just do it, fell in love with it at the same time. Simultaneously that week I had character called little tasty that completely went viral, and that was just kind of on a whim, with the homies and all that stuff. So it was this week of like, Oh, let me just fully commit to comedy, you know, let me just dive in completely. Just why I'm gonna be on a billboard one day. You've amy load tasty. I'm on that Bill. Bore, I'm still bored. When I listened to these raps, a couple of months after she had really started going for it, Carson daily, who was the morning host of amp, heard about Sherry's success. Like he was like wait, this girl does stand up and she does this character that went viral. Why aren't we utilizing her? So then I met with him and then basically I ended up like doing a segment, like a comedic segment, on their morning show. Like it was kind of sporadic, you know, it wasn't to too consistent, but you know, they had me on whenever they could just to talk about what happened this week in a funny way, you know what I mean. So then eventually I got my own show on Sunday nights. Her show was called the bay show and on it she interviewed musicians like Khalid, fifth harmony and Noah Cyrus, and it was really cool. It was really, really cool, like truly, and that was actually around the same time I started acting. Sherry got her first opportunity, playing Natalie on Jill Solloway's two thousand and Sixteen Amazon show. I Love Dick Joe Solloway is also an amazing non binary creative responsible for the show transparent and the two thousand and thirteen film afternoon delight. Jill, if you're listening, you're amazing. So it was really cool being on a set like that, you know, which was so diverse and inclusive, etc. And every umbrella, you know what I mean. And then I went on to just doing more and more. While pursuing acting, she continued to own her stand up chops and she's still very much a part of the stand up world where, she says, she has the support of a solid community of like minded comics, a couple of them a feel though, maybe a handful our queer Asian females, you know what I mean. So it's like we exist, you know, it's...

...just when we finally pop off in the mainstream, you know, people will be more aware of us. But, like a stand up first of all, is not overnight. You know, that's the thing that I've realized, because with acting you could book your very first role ever and it be the life changing thing that movie started, you know what I mean. But stand up comedy, that is a hustle, like it matters how many hours you've put into it. Truly like the honing of that craft. You know I mean you're literally creating these words yourself and then performing it alone. You know what I mean. It's very there's a lot of workshopping, you know, there's a lot of improving, you know. So it's definitely a grind. And I've only been doing it for three and a half years, you know, since that beginning of that journey that I've that I told you about it from radio, you know. So I haven't even been doing it for that long, but I feel like, you know, I do have this unique voice in like your perspective. That's, you know, a refreshing if you will, so like with me, like I don't actually I talked about a whole bunch of stuff. Since starting her stand up career she's performed with more and more high quality comedians. She opened for our Senior Hall in Florida and recently Chris Catan in Vegas. She even opened for Ronnie Chang's netflix taping. But before all that, before she really got her career moving, she almost lost her momentum. After doing I love Dick and the MTV show safe word, everything kind of slowed down. Like I did not book anything for like a solid like year until the I did clause on TNT and after clause it was good trouble. So I maybe I did like a Costar here and they're and like little things, but because I had that much downtime, because it was kind of a for me, even though I'd only been in the damn game for like minutes, you know what I mean, it felt like this plateau of like, you know, just kind of like, Oh, I'm not really getting any work. So I started creating things myself. You know what I mean. That's what you need to do. I started writing, I started developing this sketch show that I'm still kind of do. It still up my sleeve. I did the sundance new voices lab with a little tasty project with my homegirl, Verni Rodriguez, who I met a funnier die brilliant. My point is, like I started to you know, of course I kept doing stand up. I just like had to take matters into my own hands, you know, once you have that much down time, because, yeah, it can. It's such an unpredictable career, you know, like even you know, with could trouble. Like you know, we just wrapped season two. We still haven't heard about season three. You know what I mean, even though people love the show, it's likely with TV shows you never freaking know. You know what I mean. You could just extremely hypothetical, but in general, TV shows that you can get canceled tomorrow and you and you don't have income anymore. You know what I mean. It's like literally, it's so up in the air that you just had kind of have to take matters into your own hands and create your own things and like in between, I don't know, I just I just kept busy, and staying busy paid off. I remember like a month before I book good trouble, there was something I didn't book and I was devastated, you know, but I'm like wow, okay, this was just written in the stars, clearly, because if I book that other thing, I wouldn't have been able to do good trouble, and it's like Whoa what, you know. So you really have to trust your path, you know. And Sherry says that path led her to playing alice on good trouble, a spinoff of the popular show the fosters. Sha's character, Alice, is the manager of the apartment complex where the two main characters live. It's so interesting because after playing Alice, I'm like wow, like I this really set the bar of like important work, you know what I mean, like truly, especially with the Community of Asian entertainers, like truly fighting for a place in Hollywood right now. I can't give up. I truly cannot give up, you know, it's not an option at this point. Like I've come too far for me to ever not do what I'm doing right now. So I think just kind of that reminder, you know, of also, like my mom and I sometimes talk...

...about how insane this all is, like once again, my mom just wanted to support me and take care of me, like she was fine with me having a comfortable life. You know, we never in a million years thought I would be on a billboard, you know what I mean, like it's nuts, you know, and that's that's really, really cool, you know. So we've already expedied, exceeded our expectations of coming to America, you know what I mean. It's like it's really cool. So, like, sure, he's on a bill board, we're done. There's some says the restaurant. We can move back to Shanghai at this point. You know what I mean, like I've peaked, but that is really cool, being on a billboard. I facetime my mom playing Alice and having her face on a billboard actually kicked off her coming out journey. I mean it's coming out stories such a strong word, or, you know, strong three words, because I don't know, it's it wasn't that much of a you know, kind of like a big moment. When we come back Sherry's complicated relationship with the whole concept of coming out. Today we're talking to my sexual comedian and actor, Sherry Kola. She took us on a journey across two continents spanning twenty years. We learned about her childhood, growing up working in her family's restaurant and the path she took to get to Hollywood from college to Radio and I love Dick to her most recent role on the freeform show good trouble. auditioning, rehearsing and filming. Good trouble made Sherry aware of the fact that she had never really come out to her parents, but seeing her character alice, living in sort of a parallel life inspired her and I was already so surprised, even in freaking two thousand and eight that someone wanted to see this character on the screen. You know, like reading the audition description of this character was like first generation Asian American, lesbian, not out to her parents, like aspires to be a stand up. That was already in the in the plans before I even went into the room, and I just was so touched that someone wrote this character and wants to see this character, because I've never seen that in my life on the screen, you know what I mean. So already I'm like, Oh, this is dope, so I'm going in and the deeper I get into that audition process, the more I realize, oh, like I need to be this character, like this character is freaking important, you know, like for Asian American girls everywhere, for a Queer Young Asian people everywhere, etc. You know what I mean. I just feel like, you know, having this as a role model, if you will, it is so necessary. So when I actually got the GIG, I was on cloud nine number one, literally tears, because this is, once again, like nothing I've ever seen on the screen before, and and I told myself, I'm like, in order to potentially become a role model, you know what I mean, like I have to live my truth. You know, Sherry says it was important for her to prepare her mom for the idea that she was going to play a lesbian on the screen, and that conversation gave her the opportunity to also tell her mom about herself, even though she wasn't concealing her sexuality and her social life. She says that they just didn't talk about it at home. And the thing about like being bisexual, like I've literally been bisexual forever, you know what I mean, like I've just been living my life. My friends know and whoever knows knows, you know what I mean, like I even talked about it in my standup sometimes. So if you have to catch it, you catch it. Okay, I don't think I'm a baby person, but I realized that babies and I actually do have a lot in common. Okay, most nights out of the week I find myself struggling a walk puke all over my clothes, you know, and after a couple shots of fireball, I found myself stuck in on a titty. I'M NOT gonna lie. But in the age of social...

...media and as a person with a public persona Sherry says she wasn't sure how big of a deal she should make of it, and I battled with that as well, like whether or not I should. You know what I mean. It's a lot of like I should I post this picture with a huge paragraph, like how, what should I do? You know what I mean, though. So I feel like I ended up just kind of talking about it, you know, just like if it comes up, it comes up because it's who I am, you know what I mean. So, as opposed to like hey, attention, attend, it's like, if you ask me about it, I'll tell you about it. You know what I mean. She knew that this was not something her mom was going to ask her about, so she decided to have a conversation. I ended up sitting my mom down and just telling her, like hey, you know, this character that you know, I'm gonna be on good trouble. She's a lesbian. And then my mom was like, Oh, okay, that's fine, okay, and then I was like no, no, but here's the thing. I was like, I also, you know, like I kind of just said, I also, you know, in Chinese, in the dialect of Shanghai. That's what we speak at the house, and she was like Huh, like like she was genuinely processing it, which I found surprising. It's just interesting, like I was surprised that she was surprised. But that's the thing. It's like, you know, where we're immigrants. This is not something that is typical publicly, if you will, in in you know, Chinese culture or you know, they're still catching up, you know what I mean, to our how open we are now with it. You know what I mean. They're still catching up to the new, new way of looking at Lgbtq community. Shr he says that being queer in the Chinese community is hard to describe because, like it was at her house, being lgbtq plus, it's just something that isn't talked about, almost in a way doesn't exist. It's not an option. It's weird you know, like you, my mom was surprised, even though, like, not to put you know, physical attributes are like, you know, a mannerisms as the defining point of someone being, you know, queer or not. But like for me, I was just surprised that she was surprised, you know what I mean, like that I like came out of my mouth. But, like, that's the thing. It's not an option in their heads, you know, it's in that traditional mindset. You know my mom as much as she supportive, and she's on board, you know, with the character I play, etc. She's so proud. It unbelievable. My mom is, like I truly do not deserve her, like I love her so much. The support is real, you know what I mean. But that's separate from, like you, she truly didn't grow up with these, you know, ideas. You know what I mean, like maybe, but it's like, Oh, you kind of probably don't talk of I don't know. But and I can't speak for every single person, you know. I can't speak for every single person in an Asian household. I can't speak for every Chinese person, but you know, it's like there are there is some progress, like obviously, Taiwan, just like in last year, I think, legalize same sex marriage, which is amazing, I mean, and you know I of course I sent the link to my mom and just, like you know, it's all about educating and like truly just opening minds, I think. But even when she dated guys in her teens and s she says she didn't really talk about that with her mom either. Not that you shouldn't, but like it just something about, like I remember. I don't know, it's this weird thing and I'm really unpacking it right now because this is my Friday therapy sesh. But like there's something about just in general, as a teenager you don't want your parents in your business. You know all that stuff. So I had my first boyfriend when I was like seventeen and I really liked them, like he and I really really liked each other and I was so like, I don't know what I was going through Brit them, but I didn't want to dance. So like the whole thing was sherry doesn't want to go to prom, like everyone freaking knew it. So he didn't ask me. So we ended up ha hanging out that night instead, whatever, but we didn't go to...

...prom. So my mom, because she like knew some of the other parents that night, she was like, Oh, wasn't there like a prom tonight? Like how come you didn't go? And and then I just kind of like lied and was like, Oh, I don't know, I didn't feel like it, instead of saying, Oh, I actually technically had a date. You know, I have a boyfriend, like, I don't know, it just you don't. You don't say it. But why? It's weird, you know what I mean? Like you just don't want them to think of you in a different way. I don't know, truly, I don't. So then that carries on, you know, and everyone else that I've dated since, like whether it just didn't get serious enough for an introduction or like they have been in the same room, but I just don't say, like, Hey, this is also I'm dating this guy, you know, whatever, etc. But I you know, it wasn't until later on that I started realizing, Oh, I really am attracted to women as well. You know what, because I had these moments like in high school where like, Oh, I would have a sleepover and like, you know, you know, girls can be very friendly and like, you know, put your their head on your shoulder or whatever, and I remember like those moments like made me so nervous, you know, and I didn't really think too deeply in the moment. Of course I had that quick thought, you know, but I'm like okay, whatever, like I'm you know, I just I don't know. But the whole thing is like when I when I realized that that I was attracted to the women and men, like, I just kind of just I was still just living my damn life pretty much. But the point is the conversations were never had with my mom, like she genuinely thought I was like a robot, like and also like she just sees me as her little dumpling, you know what I mean, her Little Red Bean Bun, you know what I mean, like she doesn't see me as this creature that like dates. It's so weirdly. She even asked me one time. She was like so when you see like a guy, like, do you feel anything, like just in general, you know what I mean, like because I've never you know, so then. Anyway, so when I finally had this conversation, it was like forty five minutes of really me crying because it was so built up, because this is so much pressure on me for so many years, you know, of like finally being real, you know what I mean, and like and you know, there was a lot of back and forth, some stuff that you know she but she's grasping it, you know what I mean. She's still kind of absorbing this information. I don't expect her to say everything right, you know what I mean, because she's learning, you know. But the point is, yeah, it's like, you know, dating wasn't really talked about growing up, let at alone sexuality, you know what I mean. So it was a big thing for me to just let my mom know, telling her mom was important. But beyond that, Sherry says she struggles with what amount of public sharing, if any, belongs in her coming out story. And I still battle with if that's necessary. I don't know. You know what, what do you think it's like? Should someone need to be like Hey, like world? I'm by say it really depends on the person right and I feel like for me, because I've always lived in such a free spirit away, to be honest, like I've always been this way, like for the most part, you know what you see in front of you. It just certain things weren't brought to light specifically to my mother. You know, I just like the point is, I've always lived so freely and like just kind of, you know, do my thing and very like laid back. You know where I'm just like. You know, if I talked about it, I talk about it. You know all that stuff. But I technically haven't had the conversation with my dad, but he literally is all up in my social media. There's no way he doesn't know, because with all the swipe ups and wipe this, I don't know. He I don't know if I feel a need to have the conversation maybe, but also like until I'm really bringing someone to his house, you know what I mean, like we'll cross our bridge when we get there. I don't know. I truly don't know. I'm still freaking...

...it out. That's the thing. It's like it's not a perfect story. It's not like Barry. It's not black and white. I'm truly just also figuring a lot of stuff out, you know what I mean. But the point is it was important for my mom to know that. That for sure was number one on my list because, you know, it just it's interesting living your life for so long and like the most important person to you does not know, like such a big thing about you. It's very I mean, but that's everyone's situation pre coming out, you know. So, like it's just said, pretty come ha, ha ha. We need that anyway. No, but the point is, I've literally I've been talking for too long about this. Now it's in because I truly am trying to grasp it myself. You know what I mean? That's the thing. We're all still trying to figure it out, you know. Yeah, it's very interesting. But the point is, my mom is a rock star. Sherry says that, despite having moved here from China as adults, her parents are both pretty open minded. So my dad actually so. My my parents aren't. It's weird. It's not that they're traditional at all, you know, they're really not, like it was not like like traditional when you think of like really traditional. I don't know. My Dad also did radio when he came to America, of course, in the Chinese radio station, and like he actually always wanted to be a famous as well and like an actor and the host, etc. Like. He always talks about this opportunity back in China where he was like snubbed and like he was in this contest where this competition where he was like the runner up of like something fame related. But like he came to America with the goal of like really embracing being an American and and and, you know, the American dream, and he, you know, he's listening to Bruno Mars and like, you know, going like watching the Lakers, you know what I mean, like, you know, those just seem like American things to me right now. Those are American partibles. Why brutal marks? Because that's one of his current obsessions, not so much in one thousand nine hundred and ninety four. But the point is he his English is better than my mom's for that reason, because he was like he wanted to be American, you know. My mom just kind of wanted to work hard provide for me, you know what I mean. But my dad was kind of, you know, he was wandering, you know what I mean. He was out there, and so he's definitely not traditional at all. You know, it's not that they're traditional, it's just, you know, something they didn't know about me. I think that's what it is at the end of the day. You know, it's like it's like if I just like told my parents that I secretly want to be a magician or something. You know, that's something that I've been hiding. It's it's almost in that sense where it's just a layer of me. They didn't know. You know, it's not like it's weird, it's not like they were ever like don't be gay, it's just it's just didn't think. I don't know. It's very it's once again, I'm still trying to figure it out, you know, I'm still trying to grasp this whole thing, you know. But interesting that in some like weird circular way, your character is also affecting your personal life because your family watches it and gets to know this character who's a lesbian. Absolutely, you don't, I mean like it's almost an educational thing for though it's a hundred percent, absolutely, still absolutely educational for them as well, and for other Asian people and other Asian parents, and I've talked about this before, of like that scene with Alice, you know, coming out to her parents, is so crucial because one I I have personally never seen that scene before. I'm trying to think if I have. Forgive me if it has been done, but I personally have never seen that scene before and by doing that, by US giving by good trouble, giving Sherry Coola, an Asian girl, and opportunities to play this character, we are representing that...

...story on this screen. Other Asian parents who maybe more old fashioned, will see it and be open to their kids being in the queer community. Literally, it a little goes such a long way, and that's why, you know, truly the narrow mind and this has been perpetuated because it has not been represented. We were not visible on the screen. You know, this didn't exist on TV. Why should anyone let it exist in real life? You know, like literally, because is the hypothetical thought, is what I'm saying. You know, like because Alice, characters like Alice, weren't on TV for twenty something years. That's why, for twenty something years Asian parents, not Asian exactly, but you know, immigrant parents, parents in general, who aren't open to their kids being in the queer community. That's why they they weren't open to it because they didn't see it. You don't mean like my point is it's like, if an Asian mom sees that scene, she'll be like, Huh, okay, maybe I'm gonna be open to my daughter also being you know Asian and queer and that should be okay. You know. I'm watching Alice's parents deal with it, you know, and and wow, alice has to go through such bizarre links a hide who she is. I don't want my daughter doing that. You know what? Yeah, I would rather my daughter be openly queer with me, you know, like you know, just these thoughts truly will be open and explored because we're showing this on the screen. So That's interesting. That may even have helped your parents because they see you totaling this role exactly come up with it to the same conclusions just from watching you do it. Like. I don't want Sharry to feel that way. Yeah, I hope sols feels I hope so. You know, that's that's the thing. Like this show is just opening so many minds and I think that's so, so, so central. Yeah, when we come back the fight for representation in the media, and Sherry teaches us a couple of new words. And before the break, Comedian Cherry Coola talked about how her character storyline on good trouble inspired her to live authentically. Coming out to her mom had another benefit. She now could be free and open in her stand up without worrying about sharing too much. Definitely, before I told my mom I was bisexual, there was that, you know, just this pressure of like should I talk about being attracted to girls in my stand up? Would if a video accidentally gets on the Internet and then my mom somehow stumbles upon it? There was a lot of like, you know chains, emotional chains, if you will, you know what I mean. So after the fact I kind of been looser about it. And in terms of my dad, I actually I didn't tell him that I'm bisexual, but I did tell him that I'm playing lesbian character. That kind of came up as well, because I have half sisters and not that like I have to prepare them for it, but I just kind of wanted them to know because they were excited to watch the show and then, you know, and it I just, you know, I just wanted to. It's messed up that we even have to preface and like, you know, you know, prepare them for such things. It's and hopefully we get to a point where it'll be so like everyone will be fine with it, where I don't need to be like hey, just so you know, there's a you know what I mean, like it's so interesting, but I just, for the sake of you know, a ten year old and a thirteen year old who, like, you know, quote unquote, like I was going to say a quote unquote, look up to me. Not that being lesbian isn't looked up to to where. You know what I mean, like it's like so many, first of all, like sign notes. So many Asian girls look up to me right now because of the representation of Alice on the screen. You know, like people Dmi all the time about how they've never seen a character like...

...this. They truly feel seen. You know, it's all my Asian girls were tell my Asian queer girls were just talking about Asians with traditional parents, etc. You know what I mean. When it comes to representation in the media, it's also important to remind people that there is no limit to the number of new faces that can find a place in the spotlight. Yeah, exactly, and hopefully that platforms gets bigger and bigger. You know, I know within the community we're very aware of each other. You know, I have a big sisterhood of Asian women actresses that you know, as well as Asian Women Comedians, where we are supporting each other. I feel like at this point, because we're seeing more and more opportunity. I always preach that, you know, we can truly put competition behind us, you know, and like empower each other. I feel like, you know, a few years back, like there were so few spots, you know what I mean, where it was easy to feel like, Oh, I need to push you out the seat, you know, but I feel like really at this point, like it's we're all in it together, you know what I mean. We have to be. We literally have to join forces for Hollywood to take it seriously, you know. So, anyway, I'm you know, I can go on for days about this stuff. But yeah, I didn't really feel I mean, I did feel like I wanted to portray this character as truthfully as possible, you know, as real as possible. The two thousand and eighteen movie, crazy rich Asians, was a big deal for Asian representation in the media. One of the stars in that movie was actress and Rapper Aquafina, who stars in the new film the Farewell, which also tells the story of a Chinese family. Alcafina is so dube. I love her so much. She is an inspiration to us all and I yeah, we've seen a bit of progress in the last couple of years, but for me, especially looking at it with Asian eyes, like I still don't think it's enough and we are not even close to being on an equal playing field yet, like there's so much more word to be done. Like truly just the gap between fresh off the boat and Margaret chose show. She had a sitcom as well on I believe it was ABC as well. I think it went for one season, but the fact that that, I mean some people didn't even know that existed, you know, mean so. So you can see how long it's freaking been. You know, same with you know, it was joy lt club was like the last like American movie with Asian leads, and then the that was like twenty five years until crazy rich and and it's really interesting. I really wonder why. Sherry says she sometimes has conversations with non Asian people in the industry and asked if they notice the lack of representation. Even being Asian, sometimes you don't realize it yourself, you know what I mean. I grew up watching friends and living single, you know, I mean, yeah, fresh prince and I literally never saw myself, but I didn't even like realize it, and that's part of the reason why she thinks the thought of becoming a performer didn't enter her mind until she was an adult, because I didn't exist in that world. So now that we are seeing more and more progress, especially with Alcapina being a damn like icon right. And that's the thing about Alcapina. She is so funny and talented and I've been watching her like I'm maybe like at least eight years ago, I was watching her on Youtube, like she was doing these funny rat videos. Fina Bit Sherry says, it was a breath of fresh air to watch an Asian girl define herself rather than having someone else present the idea of her through non Asian eyes. But this progress has been in the works for a long time. It's been cultivated by a lot of talented people, like it is not overnight, you know what I mean, like a lot of these Asian faces have been working and hustling for so long. I mean Randall Park, I was watching him like on while then out he was on the original MTV...

Whilda. Now, like that was how many years ago? Ali Wong, I saw her for the first time on Chelsea. Lately, the Round Table. That was how many years ago? You don't mean these people have existed truly. It's just now they're finally getting the attention they deserve. There does seem to be some new and hard one momentum building for Asian representation. But before all this, there were the pioneers of the S and early Otts, like Lucy Lou yeah, with Charlie's angels. That was huge, now that I think about it, that was like kind of really a big deal and and yeah, she's definitely up there and as one of the pioneers, a thousand percent, you know what I mean. And and John Choe as well. You know what I mean, like people who are leads of movies. Yeah, for sure be you want. I'm yeah, meing. Mean when you know the WHO played in Mulan and she was also enjoy look club, and it just there were sprinkles of a few. Now it's like, but now it's like, I mean there's still so much work to be done, you know, like now we are seeing more and more progress and I'm excited because I know it's not a phase. You know what I mean? I know it's not just like an Asian trend that's happening right now. I feel like literally we've latched on, we've given the world a taste, and clearly from things like crazy rich Asians, the farewell like, these are quality things that we've pushed out. So I think we've proved that, you know, that we can be taken seriously and telling me these stories and, you know, like highlighting our culture at the same time being relatable as human and beings, you know, because crazy, which Asians Asian aside, it was an incredible rom calm, you know what I mean. The farewell like it. It is such a universal story of Your Grandmother, you know, and this family, like the family dynamics, you know. So it's like all of these things are relatable, like Asians can tell these stories too, you know. So yeah, we're doing we're doing a lot and and I really hats off to Aquafina for really killing it seriously in like kind of showing the world that we're out here and there's so many of us out here along with her, you know what I mean. So I'm excited for what the future brings. The future is bright for Sherry COOLA. You can watch her play Alice on season one and two of good trouble. Plus you can catch her in a couple of upcoming future films. I hope that the world will see this soon. I recently did a movie with Nina Dobrev and a bunch of other amazing women called sick girl, and I think they might be doing the festival route, but I'm so excited for for the world to see that because it's this comedy about for friends who you know, like the French is tested and kind of the lengths you go to keep, you know, your your girls, you know what I mean, by your side, and it's hilarious. And I also did this other movie called endings, beginnings, directed by Drake Dremus, opposite shale and Woodley, and I play one of her friends. I'm not like in it that much, but it's pretty dope that I was. I think that should be hidden theater sued. That's right here also. Oh, there's this show called the funny dance show on e that I was a part of. We comedians dance battle, so that was doube. I think that should be on the horizon as well. Hopefully we hear news about good trouble, news about good trouble. Exactly good news in the days between our interview and today, good trouble was renewed for a third season. Meanwhile, Cherry says she's working on her stand up writing and keeping little tasty alive. Get a lot of stuff up my sleep, so hopefully they come to light very soon. Connect with Sherry. On instagram, it's Sherry Kola without the e. It was taken like this, like older white lady in like Arkansas is also named Hrry Coola. You didn't like dam her and say like could I have that? I think I actually did, but I don't think she's active like what. No, here's the thing. I think she's active...

...enough for instagram not to, you know, Shun her, because we've tried, we really tried, but it's fine. But it's fine. Sherry Kola without the eat on instagram. And you're just supposed to teach me a little bit of Manaderin here. So yeah, something fun. We got it. Okay, so you boobs, boobs, I like that. Okay, let's do it. This was easy. I'm sorry, Nana, Nana. So we actually I just realized that's Shanghai knees. I forgot. I get it mixed up sometimes. So I was born in Shanghai. So I speak the dialect of Shanghai, but I learned Mandarin because my parents own a restaurant and I was just like talking with the customers and stuff like that. So I'm actually going to teach you Shanghainnee. That's even more niche. WHO. Yeah, so Nana is Moovingston, Nana is boobs, and Nana. You could add it to your resume. Nana is boobs. Felt like it would be like fanatically like an ANA. I think. So, okay, Nana, which class is close to like Nana, which is grandma, because you know, there's a lot of acts at marks and in Chinese languages. Yeah, yeah, so if you want to say Nanea use uh, you say in between, kind of like saying it's Grandma's boobs. So you can say Nananana, NNNNANA, low Kuit, low Kuai, grandma's boobies are really cute, manny, and I'm not low quit Nice. Then I look quit. Yeah, and that's how you say grandma's boobies are really cute. Yes, that could be the title of this episode two. That's the payoff. Pride is a production of Straw hut media. If you like the show leave us a rating and a review on Apple, podcast, spotify or wherever you're tuning in from. Share us with your friends, subscribe and follow us on Instagram, facebook and twitter, at pride. You can follow me at leave by chambers, babies over billboards. That's the title of my Netflix Special.

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